SORRENTO, ITALY

COURSE CATALOG

SORRENTO COURSES

FIND YOUR COURSES

Courses are taught in English, except for Italian Language courses. Semester students will take 4-6 courses and typically earn 15 credits, while Summer and January students will take 1-2 courses and earn 3-6 credits per session, with a potential of 12 credits for a full summer (June and July sessions combined).

(Browse courses by expanding the sections below to reveal course codes, credits, descriptions, and syllabi if available.)

Please note, courses are subject to change.

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ITALIAN STUDIES

Italian Language - Elementary (A1)

Course Code: WL 101
Contact Hours:  45
US Credits:  3

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

· Demonstrate a basic understanding of Italian spelling and pronunciation (assessment: Homework; oral participation in class; oral comprehension quizzes and tests; dictations)

· Demonstrate a basic understanding of part of the Italian grammar and syntax (assessment: Homework–workbook; computer assignments; essay; quizzes and tests)

· Participate in simple conversations on topics on everyday situations such as work, education, food, time, weather… (reinforced through in-class group activities)

· Demonstrate basic reading comprehension skills (in-class or homework reading assignments–from textbook or internet sites; quizzes and tests)

· Demonstrate some knowledge of Italian geography, history, culture and daily life

Italian Language - Elementary (A2)

Course Code: WL 102
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

Italian 102 will establish the foundations of conversation and grammar. Students will work on basic grammar and speaking skills through conversation, dialogues, exercises and drills; develop vocabulary through reading, discussing and writing; and learn more about Italian culture through reading, video and presentations.

Instructional Objectives

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • carry on basic conversations
  • read articles and short stories
  • write short compositions in Italian

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Italian Language - Intermediate (B1)

Course Code: WL 201
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

This course is designed for students who wish to develop the skills necessary to interact in the language and learn about Italian contemporary culture and society as well as Italy’s history. Students will continue to refine their speaking skills by completing tasks with your classmates in pairs and small groups and by following models of native speakers presented on video. Students will develop reading and writing skills by reading increasingly more elaborate authentic texts and writing related, reaction essays, and your listening skills will be cultivated by completing on-line listening activities, viewing and analyzing short clips from Italian movies, and listening to short lectures on topics in Italian culture, society, and history, such as Pompeii, the contemporary demographic profile of Italy, the history of the language, and of the unification of Italy.

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Italian Language - Advanced (C1)

Course Code: WL 325
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • demonstrate advancement in spoken and written language;
  • communicate with advanced grammatical structures, idiomatic expressions and refined vocabulary;
  • communicate personal opinions in group discussions on a variety of topics, articles, events and personal stories.

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Italian Language - Post-Advanced (C2)

Course Code: WL325
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

Italian 106 aims to guide students to become aware of their personal learning style and strategies, and to support them in their independence. Students need to have completed 5 semesters of Italian language. The language acquisition process takes place and is reinforced through daily contact with the language and through an interactive computer component. The grammatical revision of the language emerges from the linguistic encounters in class, where language teaching is embedded in the socio-cultural context of contemporary Italy. The multimedia component reinforces, tests and contextualizes language learning done in the classroom and is regarded as an essential part of this course.

Medieval Italian Literature I - Dante

Course Code: WL 325
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

Dante Alighieri is the most important Italian poet, the father of Italian language and the principal figure of Medieval Literature in Europe.

This course will examine Dante’s Divine Comedy and some other minor works of his (i.e.“Vita Nuova” and “Convivio”). The course aim is to allow students to examine his internationally renowned literary texts in their original language.

Students will read excerpts from these works and engage in ahistorical, literary and rhetorical analysis of texts while determining techniques of poetic composition. Students are expected to actively participate and contribute to class discussion. They are also expected to do all the exercises assigned daily.

*Students must have earned at least 12 credits of Italian language as the course will be instructed in Italian.

Medieval Italian Literature II

Course Code: WL325
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

Students will study Italian literature from the 14th to the 16th Century. Students will critically analyze the internationally renowned literary texts in their original language. Course’s focus is to understand the changing view of the world between the 14th and 16th centuries. The same key concepts will be compared through the different declinations in the Medieval and the Renaissance world. Students will understand the importance of some authors in the Italian literary scene in relation to the historical and cultural events of that +me Students are expected to actively participate and contribute to class discussion. They are also expected to write a composition every week.

*Students must have earned at least 12 credits of Italian language as the course will be instructed in Italian.

Modern Italian Literature

Course Code: WL325
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

Students will study Italian literature from the 17th to 19th Century. Students will critically analyze the internationally renowned literary texts in their original language. Authors include G. Leopardi, U. Foscolo, A. Manzoni and others. Students will read excerpts from these works and engage in a historical, literary and rhetorical analysis of texts while determining techniques of poetic composition. Students will also learn about the lives of authors and the historical context and how these affected the masterpieces studied. Students are expected to actively participate and contribute to class discussion. They are also expected to do all the exercises assigned daily.

*Students must have earned at least 12 credits of Italian language as the course will be instructed in Italian.

Contemporary Italian Literature

Course Code: WL325
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

Students will study Italian literature of the Twentieth Century.

Students will critically analyze the internationally renowned literary texts in their original language.

Authors include Pirandello, Quasimodo, Ungaretti, Montale and others. Students will read excerpts from these works and engage in a historical, literary and rhetorical analysis of texts while determining techniques of poetic composition. Students will also learn about the lives of authors and the historical context and how these affected the masterpieces studied. Students are expected to actively participate and contribute to class discussion. They are also expected to do all the exercises assigned daily.

*Students must have earned at least 12 credits of Italian language as the course will be instructed in Italian.

CLASSICS

Elementary Latin

Course Code: WL 101
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits: 3

This course provides students with a proficiency-oriented immersion in beginning Latin which is geared primarily toward reading comprehension. Emphasis is on studying the fundamentals of grammar (morphology and syntax) and vocabulary.

Students study basic grammar and learn the essential elements of Latin pronunciation in order to be able to read simple passages in Latin.  

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Pre-Intermediate Latin

Course Code: WL 102
Contact Hours:  45
US Credits:  3

During this course students will gain a mastery of the first principles of Latin grammar that they have studied in Latin I. Students will also study the Latin syntax in order to be able to read quite complex sentences in Latin. The relationship between English and Latin is emphasized in vocabulary building, word derivation, and meanings of prefixes and suffixes. More advanced vocabulary and language structures are presented to students within the context of the themes and topics.

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Introductory Ancient Greek

Course Code: WL 101
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits: 3

This is an introductory course in which you will learn the simplest grammatical concepts and proceed step by step to the more difficult. The Greek course is designed to help you develop proficiency in writing and especially reading Ancient Greek. Such a goal means that you will acquire certain linguistic knowledge and skills (e.g. pronunciation, vocabulary, morphology and syntax), but it also means that you need to understand the culture that produced texts in Greek and used it on a daily basis.

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Ancient Cultures

Course Code: HUM 311
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits: 3

This course is an introductory survey of ancient Greece and Rome. We will focus primarily on political, social and military history, but we will not ignore art, architecture and literature. By the end of the term you should have a good sense of how Greek and Roman political ideas and institutions developed and operated, the kinds of social problems each era and culture faced, as well as an understanding of broader cultural trends and ideas which originated in antiquity and are still with us today. The core values of these two cultures, along with their achievements and failings, have been and remain deeply influential on our own world.

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

a. Critically describe some of the political, social or economic systems, historical, cultural or spiritual traditions, and/or technological innovations around the world;
b. Demonstrate an awareness of the diversity of people or traditions in our world in ways that promote effective engagement, both locally and globally;
c. Use political, social, economic, historical, cultural, spiritual or technological knowledge to evaluate contemporary issues.

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ARTS AND HUMANITIES

Introductory Writing

Course Code: ENGL103
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

ENGL 103 focuses on the development of skills necessary for reading analytically and writing clear, accurate, coherent expository prose. It also introduces students to basic research skills, library resources, and documentation systems.
This student-centered, inquiry-based writing course is designed to help students throughout their college careers and as they enter communities beyond the college. Inquiry-based writing is designed to engage the student in both problem posing and problem solving. Drawing on the rhetorical situation—specifically, audience, purpose, and context—instruction emphasizes the social nature of inquiry and how writers test ideas to discover the reasons behind and for discursive choices.
Students practice recursive writing processes, such as peer review, in order to help them adapt to changing demands of writing within the college and their lives.

Creative Writing

Course Code: ENGL 306 WI
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

With a particular focus on the connection between narrative and identity formation, this course is an introduction to the interrelated techniques of the creative process.

Exploring the symbiotic relationship between reading and writing, students are encouraged to read as writers, as they investigate and develop a voice of their own while they engage in dialogue with representative texts from various genres and time periods. As a way to foster further critical engagement, academic theory from the fields of postmodernism, post-colonialism and psychoanalysis will accompany literary works in English.

Class time will be spent discussing the writer’s craft, assigned readings and student submissions. Through selected literature and assignments, students are, above all, encouraged to be analytical readers and thoughtful writers who interact with the experience of living and breathing a culture that is different from their own.

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World Literature

Course Code: ENGL 203
Contact Hours:  45
US Credits:  3

This course acquaints students with significant figures and works of world literature.
We live in a world of fast and fleeting connections. Whether online or offline, we are flooded by images, texts, sounds, videos, status updates, Instagram photos, and other streams of information. Some believe that we are losing the capacity to focus and concentrate, a multitude of others that we are developing new skills and capacities, adapting to digital media in ways that are redefining out relationship to the creation of meaning.

How can “world literature” help to us navigate the predicament of the postmodern present? What can it do for our understanding of where we are, where we’ve been, and where we’re going? What does “world literature” actually mean? Are we talking about a specific canon of texts, or simply a perspective, a methodology, a way of reading literature that transcends national boundaries and opens new networks and modes of understanding? In this course, we’ll tackle these questions by engaging with a number of different texts and genres not just from the Western- European tradition, but also from other cultural and historical traditions across the globe as well. Using an interdisciplinary approach, this course explores a vast range of expression (from inscriptions on ancient tablets to poetry, cinema, and theater), while paying particular attention to the role of genre, media, and narrative in shaping humanity and the human condition.

Class requirements include regular participation, a reading journal, a midterm, a poetry illustration project, and a final exam.

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History of Art from Ancient Greece to Italian Renaissance

Course Code: ARH 376
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

Art is the highest expression of a culture. Political, historical and social changes lie at the heart of art. Works of art are the reflection of the ages in which they are produced and are often used as a “tool” to carry messages. During our classes we will focus on the study of the development of art during the centuries and how it affects today’s artists. We will have a brief review of the main artistic movements starting from the ancient Greek reaching Italy’s Baroque period.

Student Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course the student will be able to:

  • Interpret a work of art with understanding of its historical and social background;
  • Demonstrate written and oral communication skills in analyzing a piece of art.

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Archaeology Field Study

Course Code: HUM 399
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

Archaeology studies past cultures and societies through their material remains. This course provides a basic introduction to the discipline, focusing on the study of some major Roman cities destroyed by the eruption of Vesuvius in 79 AD. The program combines the archaeological study with the analysis of the historical, economic and social aspects of the Roman culture of the era. Students participate in several site visits to examine the remains and reconstruction of the ancient cities.

Student Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course the student will be able to:

  • know the history of the eruption of Vesuvius in 79 AD and its consequences;
  • understand the characteristic features of Latin civilization (i.e. economy and society) of the second century;
  • analyze the importance of the archaeological heritage of cities such as Pompeii and Herculaneum.

World Geography

Course Code: GEOG200
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

This course is designed to accommodate students who are majoring in Geography but also in other fields and are interested in obtaining a basic familiarization with places throughout the world and geographic concepts.
This course considers how the key concepts of place and space can be used to understand the special character and interactions of history, culture, economics, and the environment in major regions of the world including North America, Europe, Russia, Pacific Rim countries, South Asia, Southwest Asia and North Africa, and Latin America.

Upon completing this class students will be able to:

  • Understand the basic methods of regional geographic research
  • Practice the methods of regional geography by describing the human and physical geography of 8 world regions
  • Analyze aspects of relative geographical position, physical geographic characteristics such as landforms, climate and weather, resources of world regions through class presentations, individual research, and discussions.
  • Interpret human geographic characteristics such as demographics, political organizations, economic conditions, language and religion through class presentations, individual research and discussions

Introduction to Philosophy

Course Code: PHIL 101
Contact Hours:  45
US Credits:  3

As an introduction to the discipline of philosophy, this course will cover a representative selection of texts and problems in the history of philosophy. The course will address the nature of philosophical inquiry and the methods it employs.

Topics to be discussed include the foundations of ethics, the sources and limits of knowledge and historical approaches to metaphysical speculation. Philosophy is not like other subjects you’ve taken in school. You will not be asked to memorize facts.

There are no fundamental principles that all philosophers accept that you must learn and apply, though you will learn principles that particular philosophers have suggested and be asked to think about how(and whether) they apply.

The order in which you learn philosophy doesn’t matter that much, though the more philosophy you know, the better you will be at any part of it. The skill of asking questions is much more important than the answers found. Philosophy is analytical and critical, speculative and creative.

Philosophy is an activity more than a collection of knowledge, a way life more than an academic subject. The goal of philosophy is combining the creative adventure of ideas with the rigorous analysis of them; it is a serious play with thought.

History of Italian Cinema

Course Code: FVA 276
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

The course introduces the student to the world of Italian Cinema. In the first part the class will be analysing Neorealism, a cinematic phenomenon that deeply influenced the ideological and aesthetic rules of film art. In the second part we will concentrate on the films that mark the decline of Neorealism and the talent of “new” auteurs such as Fellini and Visconti. The last part of the course will be devoted to the cinema from 1970’s to the present in order to pay attention to the latest developments of the Italian industry. The course is a general analysis of post-war cinema and a parallel social history of this period using films as “decoded historical evidence”. Together with masterpieces such as “Open City” and “The Bicycle Thief” the screenings will include films of the Italian directors of the “cinema d’autore” including “The Conformist”, “Life is Beautiful”, “Le conseguenze dell’amore”.

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Drawing on Location

Course Code: ART 376
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

Lectures and field sketching sessions are centered on drawing on location as the best way we have to increase our capacity to observe and to understand reality. An object, a tree, a person, cities or landscapes: during everyday life or while traveling, journaling and sketching from reality is a profound and lasting experience. While drawing, we learn to see and we can select information and highlight details better than we could with a camera. Students will discover Sorrento and its region of Campania, visiting Naples and surrounding archaeological sites, recording their observations through images and words in a travel sketchbook. Freehand drawing and location drawing as basic and complementary skills are recommended; not only among architects, visual artists, animators and graphic designers, but also in disciplines such as archaeology, history, zoology, botany, and geology. Classic drawing exercises, as suggested by authors such as Kimon Nicolaides or Betty Edwards, will also help beginners to break the ice with life drawing and get the most out of the experience.

Introduction to Digital Photography

Course Code: ART 205
Contact Hours: 60
US Credits:  4

Introduction to Digital Photography gives students fundamental skills for effectively recording travel, home, and work experiences. Using digital photography as a tool, students are encouraged to become more careful observers of the people, the landscape, the art, the architecture, and the culture that they encounter in their daily lives.

The course concentrates on technical lectures and lab/studio time regarding the basic operation of a digital camera and the processing of images. Students develop an understanding of the elements that combine to create powerful visual images: subject matter, composition, color, and light. Through selected readings, assignments, lab/studio time, and critiques, students produce a written and visual final project for the course.

Students are responsible for providing their own cameras, supplies, and image editing software.

Required supplies:
You can find below the material that the photography professor will require for the course:

  • CAMERA FILM 35 MM
  • DIGITAL CAMERA SLR
  • INSTANT CAMERA (FUJI INSTAX WIDE or FUJI INSTAX MINI POLAROID CAMERA or POLAROID ZYNC)
  • Also suggested: 50 MM LENS F 1.4/F 1.8 /F 2.8
  • USB Flash drive

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BUSINESS AND ADMINISTRATION STUDIES

Competing in the Global Environment

Course Code: INB 303
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

This course is intended to provide the student with a comprehensive introduction to business in the European Union. The course describes how economic, political and social factors interrelate, and influence business in Europe. Students will use a framework to research sustainable business practices from different European Union member state’s perspective. Guest lecturers and field trips are planned for students enrolled in the study abroad program.

Student Learning Objectives

At the end of the course the student will be able to do the following:

1. Analyze the origins of the EU, its history and development to the point of enlargement.
2. Identify important steps in EU integration, name EU institutions and understand how they interact with one another
3. Analyze the impact of the social and cultural influences brought about by the enlargement of the EU.
4. Determine how business and trade are conducted both internally and externally by the organizations of the EU.
5. Conduct a sustainable business analysis (SWOTS) for a specific industry sector operating in Italy.
6. Analyze how companies should react and position themselves strategically and operationally responding to key issues in Europe’s evolving sustainable business environment.

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Global Business: Italy and Tourism

Course Code: INB 421
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

The course presents concepts of tourism relating to food and geography, using Italy as its example. The course is relevant to students of all backgrounds but was designed specifically for students of hospitality, business, and culinary arts. Students will study international organizations operating in tourism (i.e. WTO) and the different types of tourism, with particular attention paid to sustainable tourism.

Students will be asked to investigate the tourism geography of Italy, becoming familiar with the most important tourist sites in Italy and Campania (through several excursions). The third module of the course will be dedicated to a very important kind of tourism in Italy and of the Campania: Food and Wine Tourism.

Sustainability

Course Code: SUST 335
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

The course aims to analyze the relationship between sustainability, economy, quality and globalization. It will also focus on the European Union and sustainable development. Other included topics will be: the food industry in Italy (focusing on the Campania region), organic farming in Italy, “local food, local market, local business” and food & wine tourism in Italy.
In particular, students will build different business model to answer the following questions:
– The choice of environmental sustainability is compatible with the consumption habits and the
impact on prices?
– How local production can change consumer habits?
– Which may be the effect on local producers?
– What is the “minimum” threshold of sustainability adequately significant, but acceptable for
customers both culturally and economically?

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Entrepreneurship and the New Economy

Course Code: ENT 481
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

The focus is the study of the entrepreneur and the entrepreneurial start-up process. Areas of concentration include the search for new venture opportunities, evaluation of the viability and attractiveness of the new venture; determining the resources required and the sources of those resources and the development of a business plan appropriate for presentation to funding sources.

COURSE AND PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES

Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to demonstrate the following:

  • Identify the role of the entrepreneur in a market economy;
  • Through a written report and presentation, demonstrate understanding of various components of entrepreneurial activity in practice;
  • Apply economic reasoning as it relates to policies impacting entrepreneurship;
  • Explain the impact of various institutions on entrepreneurial activity in the short run and long run;
  • Evaluate various public policies for their effect on entrepreneurial activity.

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Principles of Marketing

Course Code: MKG 301
Contact Hours:  45
US Credits:  3

This course provides an introduction to basic marketing concepts. Topics include the marketing mix, new product development, consumer behavior, customer relationship management, strategic planning and e-commerce. Students will develop a comprehensive marketing plan and apply course concepts to real or imaginary products.

Learning Goals
The content of this course addresses the following goals:

  • Professional competency and professional identity
  • Strong communication and interpersonal skills
  • Diverse and global perspectives
  • Commitment to ethical practices and service

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Introduction to Sociology

Course Code: SOC 203
Contact Hours:  45
US Credits:  3

Our focus on “sociological imagination” will help us unravel the visible and invisible relationship between social/collective contexts and private domains.

Further, we will examine this relationship between social contexts and personal concerns as dynamic and rooted in historical processes, rather than being stagnant and unchanging. Specifically, we will focus on categories and processes shaped by social time and space.

So for example, we will examine questions like: what is gender and how is this idea shaped by social processes? We will ask similar questions with respect to other socially created categories such as race, ethnicity, economic status, political identity etc. An underlying theme of our course will be to keep in mind the developments and challenges ushered in by new technologies and processes of globalization in the 21st century.

World Religions

Course Code: RELG 101
Contact Hours:  45
US Credits:  3
Since religion has been, is and will continue to be a powerful and perennial force in human culture, this course provides the opportunity for the student to gain an in-depth insight into the diversity of religions throughout the world in terms of their history, world-views, practices, goals and ideals. Whether we distance ourselves from religious traditions or embrace them, we cannot avoid the influence of religious ideas, practices, images, languages and values in our everyday life, work and play. The course will examine the Buddhist, Christian, Confucian, Hindu, Islamic, Jewish, and Shinto traditions.

This class will contextualize world religions within the larger contours of human history and relevant issues from comparative religious studies, so the student will learn to recognize and find meanings in a variety of religious expressions while discovering that misinterpretations of these religious expressions can lead to inaccuracies, stereotypes and distortions. Attitudes of respect and appreciation for religious diversity are encouraged throughout the course. By studying some primary sources, the student will begin to appreciate the complex history of each religion.
The comparison of different religions will help students synthesize the basic elements of all religions. By the end of the course, students should have a better understanding and tolerance for the idiosyncrasies of the different religions and appreciate the people and cultures through which these religions are manifest.

History of Contemporary Italy

Course Code: HIST 350
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

In this course, students will examine Italian history, beginning with the end of World War II and the birth of the Italian Republic. The clashes between various political parties, the Cold War, the economic boom and terrorism in the 1970s will also be analyzed. Students will later examine the political degeneration of the 80s, “Tangentopoli” and the new political system in the Berlusconi era. Particular attention will be devoted to foreign policy, focusing on Italy’s role in the international arena with an emphasis on the European unification process with Italy as a leading country. The faculty will generate a critical discussion on these topics, inviting students to think independently about the causes and consequences of the events that they study. Students are expected to actively participate and contribute to class discussion. Evaluation will include two written exams and one 5 page research paper.

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History of the Mafia

Course Code: HIST 350
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

The course examines the history of southern Italian organized crime syndicates from their origins to the present day. It also focuses on how these mafias work and have succeeded, on their activities as well as on modern-day approaches to combating the criminal presence in Italy, including the reaction of civil society organizations.

Attention is paid to examples of Mafia enterprises, its past and present role in politics, and its evolution from a regional organization to one with an international reach. A research project, with both a paper and an oral presentation, is required in addition to two written exams.

Student Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course the student will be able to:

  • discuss the historical origins of the Mafia;
  • describe how the Mafia works and the tactics it has used to succeed;
  • discuss past and present Mafia enterprises;
  • describe the role the Mafia has and does play in Italian politics;
  • critically examine the different approaches used to combat the Mafia;
  • describe the evolution of the Mafia from an organization that was regional in scope to one today that has international reach;
  • employ basic research techniques to locate, evaluate and synthesize information from a variety of sources.

Western Civilization since 1648

Course Code: HIST 165
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

This course provides an introduction to the political, intellectual, cultural, and economic features of Western civilization from the early modern period to the mid-twentieth century. The topics covered will include the roots of Western Civilization, Enlightenment, French Revolution and Napoleon, Industrial Revolution, Liberalism, Romanticism, Nationalism, Socialism, Imperialism, the First World War, Totalitarianism, World War II, postWar Europe, the rise of Western feminism, post modernism and the current communications revolution, and globalization trends.

Anthropology of Europe

Course Code: JU 330
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

This course will examine cultural diversity in contemporary Europe as the continent struggles to compete in an evolving global environment. Students will explore many different aspects of Europe today including issues relating to the development of the European Union and to gender, migration, religion, nationalism, crime, food and social innovation.

Student Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course the student will be able to do the following:

1. Discuss the values of and challenges faced by the European Union today.
2. Describe the power of organized crime and its impact on European governance.
3. Identify the main gender issues facing the continent today and discuss possible remedies.
4. Describe the history and goals of European nationalist organizations extant today.
5. Analyze the role of religion in today’s Europe.
6. Discuss past and present patterns of migration to and from Europe.
7. Discuss how social innovation is changing European economies and societies.
8. Describe both the cultural and the economic meaning of food in Europe today.

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Mediterranean Culture and History

Course Code: IS 305
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

The goal of this course (45 contact hours, 3 credits) is to offer a wide introduction to the main evolution of the Mediterranean, using not just history but its cultures, religions and peoples as well. The main topics covered are: Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Greece, Rome, Germanics, Byzantines, the Atlantic and the Mediterranean, the Renaissance, the different Mediterranean families and the Modernization of the Mediterranean Societies. These topics will not be covered chronologically but by item. Although each lecture will maintain a chronological structure. At the end of each module, students will be invited to prepare and present oral presentations covering one of the topics of the module.

At the end of the course, students will write a 15-page essay concerning one of the topics studied during the course.

International Politics

Course Code: POL 208
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

This course is an introduction to the field of International Relations. The first module of the course will present the major theoretical frameworks developed and employed to analyze of world politics. Thinking in terms of theory is the only way to ponder over international dynamics and processes in an informed and proper way.

The second part of the course will refer to those theories in order to make sense and discuss some of the major themes currently pertaining to world politics: international security, globalization, transnational terrorism, human rights, with a strong focus on development cooperation and the issues related to migrants/refugees (module C).

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Human Rights

Course Code: POL 375
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

The purpose of this module is to examine the history, development, structure and efficacy of international human rights law. In this module, students will investigate the legal framework of the United Nations and regional systems relating to the protection and promotion of, inter alia, the rights of minorities and indigenous peoples, women’s rights, the rights of migrants and refugees, cultural rights, and the emerging field of environmental rights. Students will assess the remedies that exist for violations of human rights law in the various systems and examine practical case studies where relevant.
On completion of the course the students will be able to:
‐ Compare the international human rights law system and regional human rights law systems;
‐ Evaluate the various mechanisms and procedures for human rights law enforcement;
‐ Critically assess specific areas of international human rights law with reference to relevant legal instruments and contemporary cases;
‐ Acquire basic competency in legal writing and research.

Geo Politics and Energy

Course Code: POL 375
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

This course examines energy in international relations. The first module of the course will present the Energy fundamentals including the historical overview, the different sources and their characteristics, the supply and demand. The second module will focus on energy security as a key perspective in the study of energy and geopolitics. It will then look at the link between energy, development and environment, and will examine a range of energy scenarios developed by distinct international and research institutions.

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Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies: History, Theory, Practice

Course Code: WGS 201
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

This interdisciplinary course provides students with an introduction to the theories and methods used in gender studies. Through the examination of a variety of topics, students will explore the ways that gender shapes societies and cultures historically and throughout the world.

Student Learning Outcomes:

1. Students will demonstrate creative thinking by linking content and insights from multiple disciplines;
2. In written, oral, and/or visual communication, students will communicate in a manner appropriate to audience and occasion, with an evident message and organization structure;
3. Students will demonstrate awareness of societal and/or civic issues;
4. Students will understand and practice academic honesty.
5. Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the interconnectedness of global dynamics (issues, processes, trends, and systems)

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SCIENCES and NATURAL SCIENCES

Introduction to Geology

Course Code: JU 330
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

The course aims to give an introduction to the science of geology. In particular, the main types of rocks are analyzed with an emphasis on genetic processes and in relationship to plate tectonics theory.

This basic knowledge will provide a background to understand and study the main geological risks, such as volcanoes, earthquakes, floods, and landslides. Specific examples from the Apennines mountain chain and Campanian plain will be examined to contextualize these topics in the Italian environment. In addition, a significant aim of this course is for students to gain a conscious relationship with the environment. The Campania region is an ideal place for experiential learning via site visits, with the opportunity for students to witness a wide range ofgeological features.

The evaluation for the course will include mid-term and final written exams, a presentation and graphical exercises.

Introduction to Volcanology

Course Code: JU 330
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

The course is an introduction to the main elements of geological sciences including stratigraphy laws, the main types of rocks, and an understanding of faults and folds. These elements will be used to understand Plate Tectonics theory. Using this theory, different kinds of volcanoes will be analyzed, examining different magmatic compositions, igneous and pyroclastic rocks, and their geodynamic environments. The role of geologic and geomorphologic processes will be analyzed in reference to volcanic risk. This course will also study landslides in volcanic soils (the case of Sarno mountains) and groundwater flow in volcanic aquifers and exploitation of thermal waters (the case of Ischia).

Introduction to Marine Biology with Lab

Course Code: MSC 101
Contact Hours: 45 hrs. classroom + 45 hrs. lab
US Credits:  4

This course focuses on the biology of organisms residing in the sea, from the diversity of planktonic communities to marine megafauna, taking into consideration the ecological principles that govern marine life. The course aims to provide a solid educational background in basic and applied marine biology. Emphasis will be placed on marine environment issues and the adaptive and evolutionary mechanisms of organisms that allow them to occupy marine habitats. In particular, the Mediterranean Sea will play a central role in the course subjects, profiting from the availability of unique ecosystems and a nearby renowned marine research institute to conduct thematic field trips and practical tutorials.

REQUIREMENTSbring a mask and a snorkel for Marine Bio field trips.

Marine Conservation

Course Code: MSC 430
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

This course will focus on the key principles of marine conservation biology, analyzing the main threats for the organisms and ecosystems that inhabit the world oceans, from the marine pollution and bio-invasions to the serious problem of fisheries and ocean over-exploitation. In the second part of the course, students will study the most important conservation approaches (fishery management, species and habitat conservation measures, etc.) and the Marine Protected Area strategies to maintain and restore the natural equilibrium. Conservation biology emerged as a recognized field of mission-oriented scholarship about a half century ago when many terrestrial ecologists, geneticists and systematists were horrified by the gathering momentum of a great planetary extinction event. After 50 years many conservation strategies reported good data in recovering population and restoring ecosystem.

HEALTH SCIENCES

Human Nutrition

Course Code: BIOL 221
Contact Hours:  45
US Credits:  3

Students will examine evidenced-based relationships between nutrition and the promotion of long-term health and well-being. They will become familiar with food-related policy and recommendations, including Dietary Guidelines, Food Labels, and evidence-based nutrition programs, and gain practical skills to make healthful dietary choices. Moreover, students will learn health promotion strategies to help influence other people’s food choices and apply these strategies to a specific modifiable chronic disease such as diabetes and heart disease.

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Nutrition for Physical Activity & Health

Course Code: KIN 427
Contact Hours:  45
US Credits:  3

This course is designed to introduce students to the study of sports nutrition, diet analysis, biochemical processes in energy metabolism, nutrition and health problems, and how it can be used to optimize performance. Emphasis will be on nutritional concepts related to the daily
training, diet, energy utilization in exercise and recovery, body composition, use of nutrient and herbal supplements and ergogenic aids as well as the special needs of athletes. The substances that are most abused in athletics will also be examined.

Learning Objectives

This course will provide students with the opportunity to:

  • Understand the relationship between physical activity, nutrition, metabolism and sport performance
  • Gain an awareness of the dietary challenges that athletes and other active people face.
  • Investigate specialized areas of sports nutrition.
  • Obtain practical knowledge related to sport nutrition counseling.

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Introduction to Health Professions

Course Code: BIOL 199
Contact Hours:  45
US Credits:  3

An overview of roles of various members of the health care system, education requirements, and issues affecting the delivery of health care.

Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to:

  • Identify roles of various health care professionals
  • Describe legal and ethical issues affecting the practice of health care professionals in Europe
  • Give examples of professionalism
  • Define the rights and responsibilities of health care professionals
  • Discuss payer sources
  • Describe various documentation and ordering systems in health care (with a focus on the Italian/European system)

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CULTURAL STUDIES

Mediterranean Nero

Course Code: JU 330
Contact Hours:  45
US Credits:  3

Inspired by the work of Paul Gilroy this course will focus on how the culture of the Black Atlantic – deviated and rerouted by sound and ideas– enters into an unsuspected dialogue with the repressed and hidden histories of a largely silenced Black Mediterranean. Using primary historical documents as well as the accounts of historians we will discuss a range of topics such as the Masaniello revolt of 1648 in Naples, the Haitian Revolution of 1799; the international dimension of Black Power; the racialization of urban space and contemporary migration from Africa towards the Mediterranean.

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New York Calls, Naples Responds

Course Code: JU 330
Contact Hours:  45
US Credits:  3

This course will trace a form of call and response between New York City and Naples. It will juxtapose these two cities within wider currents, moving across time and space and tracing multiple histories that connect past, present and futurity, local and global. Topics will include the early slave rebellions in the Americas, the 1648 rebellion of Naples, the U.S. military presence in Naples during World War II and Cold War era, Italian immigration to New York City and the urban crises of Naples and New York in the 1970s and 1980s.
In this course, music, cinema and other cultural expressions are not considered as a background but become central narrative devices. Sustained by the saxophone sound of James Senese, the electro funk of Afrika Bambaataa, the echo chamber effect of Sha-Rock, the poetry of Sandra María Esteves, the blue maps of Bobby Womack and Mario Merola we will study unexpected and critical connections between New York City and Naples.
In addition to music, films, and poems, we will use other primary sources collected at the archives of the Center for Puerto Rican Studies at Hunter College, the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture of the New York Public Library, the Bronx County Historical Society and the National Library of Naples.

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Mediterranean Migration

Course Code: TBA
Contact Hours:  45
US Credits:  3

The purpose of this course is to provide an introductory overview to Mediterranean migration patterns and trends by examining macroeconomic and geopolitical causes. The course begins with a survey of the historic legacies of Mediterranean migration and moves through the twentieth century with an examination of mass emigration from the Southern Mediterranean to the Americas. By using international economics, demographics and geopolitics as a lens through which to view current Mediterranean migration phenomena, this course prepares the student to analyze effects of mass migration on the stability of the European Union and the Euro zone and propose solutions to ongoing systemic pan-European political and demographic challenges.

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ITALIAN STUDIES

Italian Language - Elementary (A1)

Course Code: WL 101
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

· Demonstrate a basic understanding of Italian spelling and pronunciation (assessment: Homework; oral participation in class; oral comprehension quizzes and tests; dictations)

· Demonstrate a basic understanding of part of the Italian grammar and syntax (assessment: Homework–workbook; computer assignments; essay; quizzes and tests)

· Participate in simple conversations on topics on everyday situations such as work, education, food, time, weather… (reinforced through in-class group activities)

· Demonstrate basic reading comprehension skills (in-class or homework reading assignments–from textbook or internet sites; quizzes and tests)

· Demonstrate some knowledge of Italian geography, history, culture and daily life

Italian Language - Elementary (A2)

Course Code: WL102
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

Italian 102 will establish the foundations of conversation and grammar. Students will work on basic grammar and speaking skills through conversation, dialogues, exercises and drills; develop vocabulary through reading, discussing and writing; and learn more about Italian culture through reading, video and presentations.

Instructional Objectives

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • carry on basic conversations
  • read articles and short stories
  • write short compositions in Italian

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Italian Language - Intermediate (B1)

Course Code: WL201
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

This course is designed for students who wish to develop the skills necessary to interact in the language and learn about Italian contemporary culture and society as well as Italy’s history. Students will continue to refine their speaking skills by completing tasks with your classmates in pairs and small groups and by following models of native speakers presented on video. Students will develop reading and writing skills by reading increasingly more elaborate authentic texts and writing related, reaction essays, and your listening skills will be cultivated by completing on-line listening activities, viewing and analyzing short clips from Italian movies, and listening to short lectures on topics in Italian culture, society, and history, such as Pompeii, the contemporary demographic profile of Italy, the history of the language, and of the unification of Italy.

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Italian Language - Advanced (C1)

Course Code: WL 325
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • demonstrate advancement in spoken and written language;
  • communicate with advanced grammatical structures, idiomatic expressions and refined vocabulary;
  • communicate personal opinions in group discussions on a variety of topics, articles, events and personal stories.

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Italian Language - Post-Advanced (C2)

Course Code: WL 325
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

Italian 106 aims to guide students to become aware of their personal learning style and strategies and to support them in their independence. Students need to have completed 5 semesters of Italian language. The language acquisition process takes place and is reinforced through daily contact with the language and through an interactive computer component. The grammatical revision of the language emerges from the linguistic encounters in class, where language teaching is embedded in the socio-cultural context of contemporary Italy. The multimedia component reinforces, tests and contextualizes language learning done in the classroom and is regarded as an essential part of this course.

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Medieval Italian Literature I - Dante

Course Code: WL 325
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

Dante Alighieri is the most important Italian poet, the father of Italian language and the principal figure of Medieval Literature in Europe.

This course will examine Dante’s Divine Comedy and some other minor works of his (i.e.“Vita Nuova” and “Convivio”). The course aim is to allow students to examine his internationally renowned literary texts in their original language.

Students will read excerpts from these works and engage in ahistorical, literary and rhetorical analysis of texts while determining techniques of poetic composition. Students are expected to actively participate and contribute to class discussion. They are also expected to do all the exercises assigned daily. 

*Students must have earned at least 12 credits of Italian language as the course will be instructed in Italian.

Medieval Italian Literature II

Course Code: WL 325
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

Students will study Italian literature from the 14th to the 16th Century.

Students will critically analyze the internationally renowned literary texts in their original language. Authors include Petrarch, Boccaccio, Ariosto, Tasso, Machiavelli, and others. Students will read excerpts from these works and engage in a historical, literary and rhetorical analysis of texts while determining techniques of poetic composition.

Students will also learn about the lives of authors and the historical context and how these affected the masterpieces studied. Students are expected to actively participate and contribute to class discussion. They are also expected to do all the exercises assigned daily.

*Students must have earned at least 12 credits of Italian language as the course will be instructed in Italian.

Modern Italian Literature

Course Code: WL 325
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

Students will study Italian literature from the 17th to 19th Century. Students will critically analyze the internationally renowned literary texts in their original language. Authors include G. Leopardi, U. Foscolo, A. Manzoni and others. Students will read excerpts from these works and engage in a historical, literary and rhetorical analysis of texts while determining techniques of poetic composition. Students will also learn about the lives of authors and the historical context and how these affected the masterpieces studied. Students are expected to actively participate and contribute to class discussion. They are also expected to do all the exercises assigned daily.

*Students must have earned at least 12 credits of Italian language as the course will be instructed in Italian.

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Contemporary Italian Literature

Course Code: WL 325
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

Students will study Italian literature of the Twentieth Century.

Students will critically analyze the internationally renowned literary texts in their original language.

Authors include Pirandello, Quasimodo, Ungaretti, Montale and others. Students will read excerpts from these works and engage in a historical, literary and rhetorical analysis of texts while determining techniques of poetic composition. Students will also learn about the lives of authors and the historical context and how these affected the masterpieces studied. Students are expected to actively participate and contribute to class discussion. They are also expected to do all the exercises assigned daily.

*Students must have earned at least 12 credits of Italian language as the course will be instructed in Italian.

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CLASSICS

Elementary Latin

Course Code: WL 101
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits: 3

This course provides students with a proficiency-oriented immersion in beginning Latin which is geared primarily toward reading comprehension. Emphasis is on studying the fundamentals of grammar (morphology and syntax) and vocabulary.

Students study basic grammar and learn the essential elements of Latin pronunciation in order to be able to read simple passages in Latin.  

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Pre-Intermediate Latin

Course Code: WL 102
Contact Hours:  45
US Credits:  3

During this course students will gain a mastery of the first principles of Latin grammar that they have studied in Latin I. Students will also study the Latin syntax in order to be able to read quite complex sentences in Latin. The relationship between English and Latin is emphasized in vocabulary building, word derivation, and meanings of prefixes and suffixes. More advanced vocabulary and language structures are presented to students within the context of the themes and topics.

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Introductory Ancient Greek

Course Code: WL 101
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits: 3

This is an introductory course in which you will learn the simplest grammatical concepts and proceed step by step to the more difficult. The Greek course is designed to help you develop proficiency in writing and especially reading Ancient Greek. Such a goal means that you will acquire certain linguistic knowledge and skills (e.g. pronunciation, vocabulary, morphology and syntax), but it also means that you need to understand the culture that produced texts in Greek and used it on a daily basis.

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Ancient Cultures

Course Code:  HUM311
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits: 3

This course is an introductory survey of ancient Greece and Rome. We will focus primarily on political, social and military history, but we will not ignore art, architecture and literature. By the end of the term you should have a good sense of how Greek and Roman political ideas and institutions developed and operated, the kinds of social problems each era and culture faced, as well as an understanding of broader cultural trends and ideas which originated in antiquity and are still with us today. The core values of these two cultures, along with their achievements and failings, have been and remain deeply influential on our own world.

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

a. Critically describe some of the political, social or economic systems, historical, cultural or spiritual traditions, and/or technological innovations around the world;
b. Demonstrate an awareness of the diversity of people or traditions in our world in ways that promote effective engagement, both locally and globally;
c. Use political, social, economic, historical, cultural, spiritual or technological knowledge to evaluate contemporary issues.

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Greek Influence in Southern Italy: Colonization & Culture

Course Code:  HIST 350
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits: 3

The course offers a historical framework to understand the Greek presence in western Europe: the sites colonized starting from the 8th century B.C., and the dynamics that caused the foundation of poleis in specific areas of the Italian peninsula.
Magna Graecia is the collective name for the Greek cities of Southern Italy. A worth premise is that Greek civilization and identity crystallized not when Greeks were close together but when they came to be far apart. It emerged during the Archaic period when Greeks founded coastal city states and trading stations in ever-widening horizons from the Ukraine to Spain. No center directed their diffusion: mother cities were numerous and the new settlements (“colonies”) would open engender more settlements. The “Greek center” was at sea; it was formed through back-ripple effects of cultural convergence, following the physical divergence of independent settlements. The course focuses on the history of the Mediterranean as seen from a variety of perspectives, including Phoenician, Greek and Roman.
Students will be also introduced to the methodology of ancient history and the critical analysis of a wide variety of historical and literary source material, including inscriptions and coins as well as the interpretation of classical texts. Archaeological evidence, including art and architecture will also be examined. Attention will also be given to the organization of the urban space in relation to politics, religion and social life. Field trips to historical sites and museums will be used to reanimate the ancient sources.

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ARTS AND HUMANITIES

Introductory Writing

Course Code: ENG 103
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

ENGL 103 focuses on the development of skills necessary for reading analytically and writing clear, accurate, coherent expository prose. It also introduces students to basic research skills, library resources, and documentation systems.

Course Objectives

This student-centered, inquiry-based writing course is designed to help students throughout their college careers and as they enter communities beyond the college. Inquiry-based writing is designed to engage the student in both problem posing and problem solving.

Drawing on the rhetorical situation—specifically, audience, purpose, and context—instruction emphasizes the social nature of inquiry and how writers test ideas to discover the reasons behind and for discursive choices. Students practice recursive writing processes, such as peer review, in order to help them adapt to changing demands of writing within the college and their lives.

Creative Writing

Course Code: ENG 306WI
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

With a particular focus on the connection between narrative and identity formation, this course is an introduction to the interrelated techniques of the creative process.

Exploring the symbiotic relationship between reading and writing, students are encouraged to read as writers, as they investigate and develop a voice of their own while they engage in dialogue with representative texts from various genres and time periods. As a way to foster further critical engagement, academic theory from the fields of postmodernism, post-colonialism and psychoanalysis will accompany literary works in English.

Class time will be spent discussing the writer’s craft, assigned readings and student submissions. Through selected literature and assignments, students are, above all, encouraged to be analytical readers and thoughtful writers who interact with the experience of living and breathing a culture that is different from their own.

World Literature

Course Code: ENG 203
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

This course acquaints students with significant figures and works of world literature.
We live in a world of fast and fleeting connections. Whether online or offline, we are flooded by images, texts, sounds, videos, status updates, Instagram photos, and other streams of information. Some believe that we are losing the capacity to focus and concentrate, a multitude of others that we are developing new skills and capacities, adapting to digital media in ways that are redefining out relationship to the creation of meaning.

How can “world literature” help to us navigate the predicament of the postmodern present? What can it do for our understanding of where we are, where we’ve been, and where we’re going? What does “world literature” actually mean? Are we talking about a specific canon of texts, or simply a perspective, a methodology, a way of reading literature that transcends national boundaries and opens new networks and modes of understanding? In this course, we’ll tackle these questions by engaging with a number of different texts and genres not just from the Western- European tradition, but also from other cultural and historical traditions across the globe as well. Using an interdisciplinary approach, this course explores a vast range of expression (from inscriptions on ancient tablets to poetry, cinema, and theater), while paying particular attention to the role of genre, media, and narrative in shaping humanity and the human condition.

Class requirements include regular participation, a reading journal, a midterm, a poetry illustration project, and a final exam.

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History of Art from Ancient Greece to Italian Renaissance

Course Code: ARH 376
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

Art is the highest expression of a culture. Political, historical and social changes lie at the heart of art. Works of art are the reflection of the ages in which they are produced and are often used as a “tool” to carry messages. During our classes we will focus on the study of the development of art during the centuries and how it affects today’s artists. We will have a brief review of the main artistic movements starting from the ancient Greek reaching Italy’s Baroque period.

Student Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course the student will be able to:

  • Interpret a work of art with understanding of its historical and social background;
  • Demonstrate written and oral communication skills in analyzing a piece of art.

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Archaeology Field Study

Course Code: HUM 399
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

Archaeology studies past cultures and societies through their material remains. This course provides a basic introduction to the discipline, focusing on the study of some major Roman cities destroyed by the eruption of Vesuvius in 79 AD. The program combines the archaeological study with the analysis of the historical, economic and social aspects of the Roman culture of the era. Students participate in several site visits to examine the remains and reconstruction of the ancient cities.

Student Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course the student will be able to:

  • know the history of the eruption of Vesuvius in 79 AD and its consequences;
  • understand the characteristic features of Latin civilization (i.e. economy and society) of the second century;
  • analyze the importance of the archaeological heritage of cities such as Pompeii and Herculaneum.

World Geography

Course Code: GEOG 200
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

This course is designed to accommodate students who are majoring in Geography but also in other fields and are interested in obtaining a basic familiarization with places throughout the world and geographic concepts.

This course considers how the key concepts of place and space can be used to understand the special character and interactions of history, culture, economics, and the environment in major regions of the world including North America, Europe, Russia, Pacific Rim countries, South Asia, Southwest Asia and North Africa, and Latin America.

Student Learning Objectives/Outcomes

Upon completing this class students will be able to:

  • Understand the basic methods of regional geographic research;
  • Practice the methods of regional geography by describing the human and physical geography of 8 world regions;
  • Analyze aspects of relative geographical position, physical geographic characteristics such as landforms, climate and weather, resources of world regions through class presentations, individual research, and discussions;
  • Interpret human geographic characteristics such as demographics, political organizations, economic conditions, language and religion through class presentations, individual research and discussions.

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Introduction to Philosophy

Course Code: PHIL 101
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

As an introduction to the discipline of philosophy, this course will cover a representative selection of texts and problems in the history of philosophy. The course will address the nature of philosophical inquiry and the methods it employs.

Topics to be discussed include the foundations of ethics, the sources and limits of knowledge and historical approaches to metaphysical speculation. Philosophy is not like other subjects you’ve taken in school. You will not be asked to memorize facts.

There are no fundamental principles that all philosophers accept that you must learn and apply, though you will learn principles that particular philosophers have suggested and be asked to think about how(and whether) they apply.

The order in which you learn philosophy doesn’t matter that much, though the more philosophy you know, the better you will be at any part of it. The skill of asking questions is much more important than the answers found. Philosophy is analytical and critical, speculative and creative.

Philosophy is an activity more than a collection of knowledge, a way life more than an academic subject. The goal of philosophy is combining the creative adventure of ideas with the rigorous analysis of them; it is a serious play with thought.

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History of Italian Cinema

Course Code: FVA 276
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

The course introduces the student to the world of Italian Cinema. In the first part the class will be analysing Neorealism, a cinematic phenomenon that deeply influenced the ideological and aesthetic rules of film art. In the second part we will concentrate on the films that mark the decline of Neorealism and the talent of “new” auteurs such as Fellini and Visconti. The last part of the course will be devoted to the cinema from 1970’s to the present in order to pay attention to the latest developments of the Italian industry. The course is a general analysis of post-war cinema and a parallel social history of this period using films as “decoded historical evidence”. Together with masterpieces such as “Open City” and “The Bicycle Thief” the screenings will include films of the Italian directors of the “cinema d’autore” including “The Conformist”, “Life is Beautiful”, “Le conseguenze dell’amore”.

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Drawing on Location

Course Code: ART 376
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

Lectures and field sketching sessions are centered on drawing on location as the best way we have to increase our capacity to observe and to understand reality. An object, a tree, a person, cities or landscapes: during everyday life or while traveling, journaling and sketching from reality is a profound and lasting experience. While drawing, we learn to see and we can select information and highlight details better than we could with a camera. Students will discover Sorrento and its region of Campania, visiting Naples and surrounding archaeological sites, recording their observations through images and words in a travel sketchbook. Freehand drawing and location drawing as basic and complementary skills are recommended; not only among architects, visual artists, animators and graphic designers, but also in disciplines such as archaeology, history, zoology, botany, and geology. Classic drawing exercises, as suggested by authors such as Kimon Nicolaides or Betty Edwards, will also help beginners to break the ice with life drawing and get the most out of the experience.

Introduction to Digital Photography

Course Code: ART 205
Contact Hours: 60
US Credits:  4

Introduction to Digital Photography gives students fundamental skills for effectively recording travel, home, and work experiences. Using digital photography as a tool, students are encouraged to become more careful observers of the people, the landscape, the art, the architecture, and the culture that they encounter in their daily lives.

The course concentrates on technical lectures and lab/studio time regarding the basic operation of a digital camera and the processing of images. Students develop an understanding of the elements that combine to create powerful visual images: subject matter, composition, color, and light. Through selected readings, assignments, lab/studio time, and critiques, students produce a written and visual final project for the course.

Students are responsible for providing their own cameras, supplies, and image editing software.

Required supplies:
You can find below the material that the photography professor will require for the course:

COMPULSORY:

  • DIGITAL CAMERA SLR OR MIRRORLESS
  • USB FLASH MEMORY

SUGGESTED:

  • CAMERA FILM 35 MM
  • INSTANT CAMERA (FUJI INSTAX WIDE or FUJI INSTAX MINI POLAROID CAMERA or POLAROID ZYNC)
  • 50 MM LENS F 1.4/F 1.8 /F 2.8

BUSINESS AND ADMINISTRATION STUDIES

Competing in the Global Environment

Course Code: INB 303
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

This course is intended to provide the student with a comprehensive introduction to business in the European Union. The course describes how economic, political and social factors interrelate, and influence business in Europe. Students will use a framework to research sustainable business practices from different European Union member state’s perspective. Guest lecturers and field trips are planned for students enrolled in the study abroad program.

Student Learning Objectives

At the end of the course the student will be able to do the following:

1. Analyze the origins of the EU, its history and development to the point of enlargement.
2. Identify important steps in EU integration, name EU institutions and understand how they interact with one another
3. Analyze the impact of the social and cultural influences brought about by the enlargement of the EU.
4. Determine how business and trade are conducted both internally and externally by the organizations of the EU.
5. Conduct a sustainable business analysis (SWOTS) for a specific industry sector operating in Italy.
6. Analyze how companies should react and position themselves strategically and operationally responding to key issues in Europe’s evolving sustainable business environment.

Global Business: Italy and Tourism

Course Code: INB 421
Contact Hours: 60
US Credits:  4

The course presents concepts of tourism relating to food and geography, using Italy as its example. The course is relevant to students of all backgrounds but was designed specifically for students of hospitality, business, and culinary arts. Students will study international organizations operating in tourism (i.e. WTO) and the different types of tourism, with particular attention paid to sustainable tourism.

Students will be asked to investigate the tourism geography of Italy, becoming familiar with the most important tourist sites in Italy and Campania (through several excursions). The third module of the course will be dedicated to a very important kind of tourism in Italy and of the Campania: Food and Wine Tourism.

Sustainability

Course Code: SUST 335
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

The course aims to analyze the relationship between sustainability, economy, quality and globalization. It will also focus on the European Union and sustainable development. Other included topics will be: the food industry in Italy (focusing on the Campania region), organic farming in Italy, “local food, local market, local business” and food & wine tourism in Italy.
In particular, students will build different business model to answer the following questions:
– The choice of environmental sustainability is compatible with the consumption habits and the
impact on prices?
– How local production can change consumer habits?
– Which may be the effect on local producers?
– What is the “minimum” threshold of sustainability adequately significant, but acceptable for
customers both culturally and economically?

Entrepreneurship and the New Economy

Course Code: ENT 481
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

The focus is the study of the entrepreneur and the entrepreneurial start-up process. Areas of concentration include the search for new venture opportunities, evaluation of the viability and attractiveness of the new venture; determining the resources required and the sources of those resources and the development of a business plan appropriate for presentation to funding sources.

COURSE AND PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES

Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to demonstrate the following:

  • Identify the role of the entrepreneur in a market economy;
  • Through a written report and presentation, demonstrate understanding of various components of entrepreneurial activity in practice;
  • Apply economic reasoning as it relates to policies impacting entrepreneurship;
  • Explain the impact of various institutions on entrepreneurial activity in the short run and long run;
  • Evaluate various public policies for their effect on entrepreneurial activity.

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Principles of Marketing

Course Code: MKG 301
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

This course provides an introduction to basic marketing concepts. Topics include the marketing mix, new product development, consumer behavior, customer relationship management, strategic planning and e-commerce. Students will develop a comprehensive marketing plan and apply course concepts to real or imaginary products.

Learning Goals
The content of this course addresses the following goals:

  • Professional competency and professional identity
  • Strong communication and interpersonal skills
  • Diverse and global perspectives
  • Commitment to ethical practices and service

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Introduction to Sociology

Course Code: SOC 203
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

Our focus on “sociological imagination” will help us unravel the visible and invisible relationship between social/collective contexts and private domains.

Further, we will examine this relationship between social contexts and personal concerns as dynamic and rooted in historical processes, rather than being stagnant and unchanging. Specifically, we will focus on categories and processes shaped by social time and space.

So for example, we will examine questions like: what is gender and how is this idea shaped by social processes? We will ask similar questions with respect to other socially created categories such as race, ethnicity, economic status, political identity etc. An underlying theme of our course will be to keep in mind the developments and challenges ushered in by new technologies and processes of globalization in the 21st century.

World Religions

Course Code: RELG 101
Contact Hours:  45
US Credits:  3
Since religion has been, is and will continue to be a powerful and perennial force in human culture, this course provides the opportunity for the student to gain an in-depth insight into the diversity of religions throughout the world in terms of their history, world-views, practices, goals and ideals. Whether we distance ourselves from religious traditions or embrace them, we cannot avoid the influence of religious ideas, practices, images, languages and values in our everyday life, work and play. The course will examine the Buddhist, Christian, Confucian, Hindu, Islamic, Jewish, and Shinto traditions.

This class will contextualize world religions within the larger contours of human history and relevant issues from comparative religious studies, so the student will learn to recognize and find meanings in a variety of religious expressions while discovering that misinterpretations of these religious expressions can lead to inaccuracies, stereotypes and distortions. Attitudes of respect and appreciation for religious diversity are encouraged throughout the course. By studying some primary sources, the student will begin to appreciate the complex history of each religion.
The comparison of different religions will help students synthesize the basic elements of all religions. By the end of the course, students should have a better understanding and tolerance for the idiosyncrasies of the different religions and appreciate the people and cultures through which these religions are manifest.

History of Contemporary Italy

Course Code: HIST 350
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

In this course, students will examine Italian history, beginning with the end of World War II and the birth of the Italian Republic. The clashes between various political parties, the Cold War, the economic boom and terrorism in the 1970s will also be analyzed. Students will later examine the political degeneration of the 80s, “Tangentopoli” and the new political system in the Berlusconi era. Particular attention will be devoted to foreign policy, focusing on Italy’s role in the international arena with an emphasis on the European unification process with Italy as a leading country. The faculty will generate a critical discussion on these topics, inviting students to think independently about the causes and consequences of the events that they study. Students are expected to actively participate and contribute to class discussion. Evaluation will include two written exams and one 5 page research paper.

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History of the Mafia

Course Code: HIST 350
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

The course examines the history of southern Italian organized crime syndicates from their origins to the present day. It also focuses on how these mafias work and have succeeded, on their activities as well as on modern-day approaches to combating the criminal presence in Italy, including the reaction of civil society organizations.

Attention is paid to examples of Mafia enterprises, its past and present role in politics, and its evolution from a regional organization to one with an international reach. A research project, with both a paper and an oral presentation, is required in addition to two written exams.

Student Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course the student will be able to:

  • discuss the historical origins of the Mafia;
  • describe how the Mafia works and the tactics it has used to succeed;
  • discuss past and present Mafia enterprises;
  • describe the role the Mafia has and does play in Italian politics;
  • critically examine the different approaches used to combat the Mafia;
  • describe the evolution of the Mafia from an organization that was regional in scope to one today that has international reach;
  • employ basic research techniques to locate, evaluate and synthesize information from a variety of sources.

Western Civilization since 1648

Course Code: HIST 165
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

This course provides an introduction to the political, intellectual, cultural, and economic features of Western civilization from the early modern period to the mid-twentieth century. The topics covered will include the roots of Western Civilization, Enlightenment, French Revolution and Napoleon, Industrial Revolution, Liberalism, Romanticism, Nationalism, Socialism, Imperialism, the First World War, Totalitarianism, World War II, postWar Europe, the rise of Western feminism, post modernism and the current communications revolution, and globalization trends.

Anthropology of Europe

Course Code: JU 330
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

This course will examine cultural diversity in contemporary Europe as the continent struggles to compete in an evolving global environment. Students will explore many different aspects of Europe today including issues relating to the development of the European Union and to gender, migration, religion, nationalism, crime, food and social innovation.

Student Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course the student will be able to do the following:

1. Discuss the values of and challenges faced by the European Union today.
2. Describe the power of organized crime and its impact on European governance.
3. Identify the main gender issues facing the continent today and discuss possible remedies.
4. Describe the history and goals of European nationalist organizations extant today.
5. Analyze the role of religion in today’s Europe.
6. Discuss past and present patterns of migration to and from Europe.
7. Discuss how social innovation is changing European economies and societies.
8. Describe both the cultural and the economic meaning of food in Europe today.

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Mediterranean Culture and History

Course Code: IS 305
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

The goal of this course is to offer a wide introduction to the main evolution of the Mediterranean, using not just history but its cultures, religions and peoples as well. The main topics covered are: Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Greece, Rome, Germanics, Byzantines, the Atlantic and the Mediterranean, the Renaissance, the different Mediterranean families and the Modernization of the Mediterranean Societies. These topics will not be covered chronologically but by item. Although each lecture will maintain a chronological structure. At the end of each module, students will be invited to prepare and present oral presentations covering one of the topics of the module.

At the end of the course, students will write a 15-page essay concerning one of the topics studied during the course.

International Politics

Course Code: POL 208
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

This course is an introduction to the field of International Relations. The first module of the course will present the major theoretical frameworks developed and employed to analyze of world politics. Thinking in terms of theory is the only way to ponder over international dynamics and processes in an informed and proper way.

The second part of the course will refer to those theories in order to make sense and discuss some of the major themes currently pertaining to world politics: international security, globalization, transnational terrorism, human rights, with a strong focus on development cooperation and the issues related to migrants/refugees (module C).

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Human Rights

Course Code: POL 375
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

The purpose of this module is to examine the history, development, structure and efficacy of international human rights law. In this module, students will investigate the legal framework of the United Nations and regional systems relating to the protection and promotion of, inter alia, the rights of minorities and indigenous peoples, women’s rights, the rights of migrants and refugees, cultural rights, and the emerging field of environmental rights. Students will assess the remedies that exist for violations of human rights law in the various systems and examine practical case studies where relevant.
On completion of the course the students will be able to:
‐ Compare the international human rights law system and regional human rights law systems;
‐ Evaluate the various mechanisms and procedures for human rights law enforcement;
‐ Critically assess specific areas of international human rights law with reference to relevant legal instruments and contemporary cases;
‐ Acquire basic competency in legal writing and research.

Geo Politics and Energy

Course Code: POL 375
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3
This course examines energy in international relations. The first module of the course will present the Energy fundamentals including the historical overview, the different sources and their characteristics, the supply and demand. The second module will focus on energy security as a key perspective in the study of energy and geopolitics. It will then look at the link between energy, development and environment, and will examine a range of energy scenarios developed by distinct international and research institutions.

Introduction to Women’s and Gender Studies: History, Theory, Practice

Course Code: WGS 201
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

This interdisciplinary course provides students with an introduction to the theories and methods used
in gender studies. Through the examination of a variety of topics, students will explore the ways that
gender shapes societies and cultures historically and throughout the world.

Student Learning Outcomes:

1. Students will demonstrate creative thinking by linking content and insights from multiple disciplines;
2. In written, oral, and/or visual communication, students will communicate in a manner appropriate to audience and occasion, with an evident message and organization structure;
3. Students will demonstrate awareness of societal and/or civic issues;
4. Students will understand and practice academic honesty.
5. Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the interconnectedness of global dynamics (issues, processes, trends, and systems)

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SCIENCES AND NATURAL SCIENCES

Introduction to Geology

Course Code: JU 330
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

The course aims to give an introduction to the science of geology. In particular, the main types of rocks are analyzed with an emphasis on genetic processes and in relationship to plate tectonics theory. This basic knowledge will provide a background to understand and study the main geological risks, such as volcanoes, earthquakes, floods, and landslides. Specific examples from the Apennines mountain chain and Campanian plain will be examined to contextualize these topics in the Italian environment. In addition, a significant aim of this course is for students to gain a conscious relationship with the environment. The Campania region is an ideal place for experiential learning via site visits, with the opportunity for students to witness a wide range of geological features. The evaluation for the course will include mid-term and final written exams, a presentation and graphical exercises.

Introduction to Volcanology

Course Code: JU 330
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

The course is an introduction to the main elements of geological sciences including stratigraphy laws, the main types of rocks, and an understanding of faults and folds. These elements will be used to understand Plate Tectonics theory. Using this theory, different kinds of volcanoes will be analyzed, examining different magmatic compositions, igneous and pyroclastic rocks, and their geodynamic environments. The role of geologic and geomorphologic processes will be analyzed in reference to volcanic risk. This course will also study landslides in volcanic soils (the case of Sarno mountains) and groundwater flow in volcanic aquifers and exploitation of thermal waters (the case of Ischia).

Introduction to Marine Biology with Lab

Course Code: MSC 101
Contact Hours: 45 hrs. classroom + 45 hrs. lab
US Credits: 4

This course focuses on the biology of organisms residing in the sea, from the diversity of planktonic communities to marine megafauna, taking into consideration the ecological principles that govern marine life. The course aims to provide a solid educational background in basic and applied marine biology. Emphasis will be placed on marine environment issues and the adaptive and evolutionary mechanisms of organisms that allow them to occupy marine habitats. In particular, the Mediterranean Sea will play a central role in the course subjects, profiting from the availability of unique ecosystems and a nearby renowned marine research institute to conduct thematic field trips and practical tutorials.

REQUIREMENTSbring a mask and a snorkel for Marine Bio field trips.

Marine Conservation

Course Code: MSC 430
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

This course will focus on the key principles of marine conservation biology, analyzing the main threats for the organisms and ecosystems that inhabit the world oceans, from the marine pollution and bio-invasions to the serious problem of fisheries and ocean over-exploitation. In the second part of the course, students will study the most important conservation approaches (fishery management, species and habitat conservation measures, etc.) and the Marine Protected Area strategies to maintain and restore the natural equilibrium. Conservation biology emerged as a recognized field of mission-oriented scholarship about a half century ago when many terrestrial ecologists, geneticists and systematists were horrified by the gathering momentum of a great planetary extinction event. After 50 years many conservation strategies reported good data in recovering population and restoring ecosystem.

HEALTH SCIENCES

Human Nutrition

Course Code: BIOL 221
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

Students will examine evidenced-based relationships between nutrition and the promotion of long-term health and well-being. They will become familiar with food-related policy and recommendations, including Dietary Guidelines, Food Labels, and evidence-based nutrition programs, and gain practical skills to make healthful dietary choices. Moreover, students will learn health promotion strategies to help influence other people’s food choices and apply these strategies to a specific modifiable chronic disease such as diabetes and heart disease.

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Nutrition for Physical Activity & Health

Course Code: KIN 427
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

This course is designed to introduce students to the study of sports nutrition, diet analysis, biochemical processes in energy metabolism, nutrition and health problems, and how it can be used to optimize performance. Emphasis will be on nutritional concepts related to the daily
training, diet, energy utilization in exercise and recovery, body composition, use of nutrient and herbal supplements and ergogenic aids as well as the special needs of athletes. The substances that are most abused in athletics will also be examined.

Learning Objectives

This course will provide students with the opportunity to:

  • Understand the relationship between physical activity, nutrition, metabolism and sport performance
  • Gain an awareness of the dietary challenges that athletes and other active people face.
  • Investigate specialized areas of sports nutrition.
  • Obtain practical knowledge related to sport nutrition counseling.

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Introduction to Health Professions

Course Code: BIOL 199
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

An overview of roles of various members of the health care system, education requirements, and issues affecting the delivery of health care.

Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to:

  • Identify roles of various health care professionals
  • Describe legal and ethical issues affecting the practice of health care professionals in Europe
  • Give examples of professionalism
  • Define the rights and responsibilities of health care professionals
  • Discuss payer sources
  • Describe various documentation and ordering systems in health care (with a focus on the Italian/European system)

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Introduction to Scientific Research

Course Code: BIOL 199
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

This class is designed to teach undergraduate students to 1) gather published and unpublished sources of information and bring them to bear on scientific questions, 2) critically read scientific writing, 3) access electronic sources of information, including but not limited to internet searches, library databases, and public information and data, 4) learn the structure and functions of different components of scientific papers to effectively communicate scientific findings, 5) learn techniques for effective communication of scientific information in oral and poster presentations, 6) understand the ethical boundaries associated with scientific communication.

The class will emphasize fundamental principles of communication, presented in lecture format, and reinforced by 1) examination of writing published by professionals, 2) in-class editing of “mock” examples of papers, 3) frequent small assignments, 4) in-class discussions, 5) completion of a paper based on sampling designed and carried out by each student, 5) an oral presentation, and 6) a poster presentation.

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CULTURAL STUDIES

Mediterranean Nero

Course Code: JU 330
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

Inspired by the work of Paul Gilroy this course will focus on how the culture of the Black Atlantic – deviated and rerouted by sound and ideas– enters into an unsuspected dialogue with the repressed and hidden histories of a largely silenced Black Mediterranean. Using primary historical documents as well as the accounts of historians we will discuss a range of topics such as the Masaniello revolt of 1648 in Naples, the Haitian Revolution of 1799; the international dimension of Black Power; the racialization of urban space and contemporary migration from Africa towards the Mediterranean.

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New York Calls, Naples Responds

Course Code: JU 330
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

This course will trace a form of call and response between New York City and Naples. It will juxtapose these two cities within wider currents, moving across time and space and tracing multiple histories that connect past, present and futurity, local and global. Topics will include the early slave rebellions in the Americas, the 1648 rebellion of Naples, the U.S. military presence in Naples during World War II and Cold War era, Italian immigration to New York City and the urban crises of Naples and New York in the 1970s and 1980s.
In this course, music, cinema and other cultural expressions are not considered as a background but become central narrative devices. Sustained by the saxophone sound of James Senese, the electro funk of Afrika Bambaataa, the echo chamber effect of Sha-Rock, the poetry of Sandra María Esteves, the blue maps of Bobby Womack and Mario Merola we will study unexpected and critical connections between New York City and Naples.
In addition to music, films, and poems, we will use other primary sources collected at the archives of the Center for Puerto Rican Studies at Hunter College, the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture of the New York Public Library, the Bronx County Historical Society and the National Library of Naples.

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Mediterranean Migration

Course Code: TBA
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

The purpose of this course is to provide an introductory overview to Mediterranean migration patterns and trends by examining macroeconomic and geopolitical causes. The course begins with a survey of the historic legacies of Mediterranean migration and moves through the twentieth century with an examination of mass emigration from the Southern Mediterranean to the Americas. By using international economics, demographics and geopolitics as a lens through which to view current Mediterranean migration phenomena, this course prepares the student to analyze effects of mass migration on the stability of the European Union and the Euro zone and propose solutions to ongoing systemic pan-European political and demographic challenges.

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History of Italian Cinema

Course Code: FVA 276
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

The course introduces the student to the world of Italian Cinema. In the first part the class will be analysing Neorealism, a cinematic phenomenon that deeply influenced the ideological and aesthetic rules of film art. In the second part we will concentrate on the films that mark the decline of Neorealism and the talent of “new” auteurs such as Fellini and Visconti. The last part of the course will be devoted to the cinema from 1970’s to the present in order to pay attention to the latest developments of the Italian industry. The course is a general analysis of post-war cinema and a parallel social history of this period using films as “decoded historical evidence”. Together with masterpieces such as “Open City” and “The Bicycle Thief” the screenings will include films of the Italian directors of the “cinema d’autore” including “The Conformist”, “Life is Beautiful”, “Le conseguenze dell’amore”.

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Italian Language

Course Code: ITAL 1303
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

Students will have the chance to put their knowledge into practice through full immersion in an Italian environment. We consider constant contact with mother tongue speakers to be of vital importance for a true understanding of our language and customs.

Creative Writing

Course Code: ENG 306WI
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

With a particular focus on the connection between narrative and identity formation, this course is an introduction to the interrelated techniques of the creative process.

Exploring the symbiotic relationship between reading and writing, students are encouraged to read as writers, as they investigate and develop a voice of their own while they engage in dialogue with representative texts from various genres and time periods. As a way to foster further critical engagement, academic theory from the fields of postmodernism, post-colonialism and psychoanalysis will accompany literary works in English.

Class time will be spent discussing the writer’s craft, assigned readings and student submissions. Through selected literature and assignments, students are, above all, encouraged to be analytical readers and thoughtful writers who interact with the experience of living and breathing a culture that is different from their own.

ITALIAN STUDIES

Italian Language - Elementary (A1)

Course Code: WL101
Contact Hours:  45
US Credits:  3

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

· Demonstrate a basic understanding of Italian spelling and pronunciation (assessment: Homework; oral participation in class; oral comprehension quizzes and tests; dictations)

· Demonstrate a basic understanding of part of the Italian grammar and syntax (assessment: Homework–workbook; computer assignments; essay; quizzes and tests)

· Participate in simple conversations on topics on everyday situations such as work, education, food, time, weather… (reinforced through in-class group activities)

· Demonstrate basic reading comprehension skills (in-class or homework reading assignments–from textbook or internet sites; quizzes and tests)

· Demonstrate some knowledge of Italian geography, history, culture and daily life

Italian Language - Elementary (A2)

Course Code: WL102
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

Italian 102 will establish the foundations of conversation and grammar. Students will work on basic grammar and speaking skills through conversation, dialogues, exercises and drills; develop vocabulary through reading, discussing and writing; and learn more about Italian culture through reading, video and presentations.

Italian Language - Intermediate (B1)

Course Code: WL201
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

This course is designed for students who wish to develop the skills necessary to interact in the language and learn about Italian contemporary culture and society as well as Italy’s history. Students will continue to refine their speaking skills by completing tasks with your classmates in pairs and small groups and by following models of native speakers presented on video. Students will develop reading and writing skills by reading increasingly more elaborate authentic texts and writing related, reaction essays, and your listening skills will be cultivated by completing on-line listening activities, viewing and analyzing short clips from Italian movies, and listening to short lectures on topics in Italian culture, society, and history, such as Pompeii, the contemporary demographic profile of Italy, the history of the language, and of the unification of Italy.

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Italian Language - Post-Intermediate (B2)

Course Code: WL 202
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

This course is designed for students who wish to develop the skills necessary to interact in the language and learn about Italian contemporary culture and society, as well as Italy’s history. Students will continue to refine their speaking skills by completing tasks with classmates in pairs and small groups. They will develop reading and writing skills by reading increasingly more elaborate authentic texts and writing essays, and their listening skills will be cultivated by in-class interactions, listening to short lectures on topics in Italian culture, listening to Italian music, and watching Italian movies.

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Italian Language - Advanced (C1)

Course Code: WL 325
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • demonstrate advancement in spoken and written language
  • communicate with advanced grammatical structures, idiomatic expressions, and refined vocabulary
  • communicate personal opinions in group discussions on a variety of topics, articles, events, and personal stories.

Italian Language - Special Topics: Post-Advanced (C2)

Course Code: WL325
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

Italian 106 aims to guide students to become aware of their personal learning style and strategies, and to support them in their independence. Students need to have completed 5 semesters of Italian language. The language acquisition process takes place and is reinforced through daily contact with the language and through an interactive computer component. The grammatical revision of the language emerges from the linguistic encounters in class, where language teaching is embedded in the socio-cultural context of contemporary Italy. The multimedia component reinforces, tests and contextualizes language learning done in the classroom and is regarded as an essential part of this course.

Medieval Italian Literature I (Dante)

Course Code: WL325
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

Dante Alighieri is the most important Italian poet, the father of Italian language and the principal figure of Medieval Literature in Europe.

This course will examine Dante’s Divine Comedy and some other minor works of his (i.e.“Vita Nuova” and “Convivio”). The course aim is to allow students to examine his internationally renowned literary texts in their original language.

Students will read excerpts from these works and engage in ahistorical, literary and rhetorical analysis of texts while determining techniques of poetic composition. Students are expected to actively participate and contribute to class discussion. They are also expected to do all the exercises assigned daily.

*Students must have earned at least 12 credits of Italian language as the course will be instructed in Italian.

Medieval Italian Literature II

Course Code: WL325
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

Students will study Italian literature from the 14th to the 16th Century. Students will critically analyze the internationally renowned literary texts in their original language. Course’s focus is to understand the changing view of the world between the 14th and 16th centuries. The same key concepts will be compared through the different declinations in the Medieval and the Renaissance world. Students will understand the importance of some authors in the Italian literary scene in relation to the historical and cultural events of that +me Students are expected to actively participate and contribute to class discussion. They are also expected to write a composition every week.

*Students must have earned at least 12 credits of Italian language as the course will be instructed in Italian.

Modern Italian Literature

Course Code: WL325
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

Students will study Italian literature from the 17th to 19th Century. Students will critically analyze the internationally renowned literary texts in their original language. Authors include G. Leopardi, U. Foscolo, A. Manzoni and others. Students will read excerpts from these works and engage in a historical, literary and rhetorical analysis of texts while determining techniques of poetic composition. Students will also learn about the lives of authors and the historical context and how these affected the masterpieces studied. Students are expected to actively participate and contribute to class discussion. They are also expected to do all the exercises assigned daily.

*Students must have earned at least 12 credits of Italian language as the course will be instructed in Italian.

Contemporary Italian Literature

Course Code: WL325
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

Students will study Italian literature of the Twentieth Century.

Students will critically analyze the internationally renowned literary texts in their original language.

Authors include Pirandello, Quasimodo, Ungaretti, Montale and others. Students will read excerpts from these works and engage in a historical, literary and rhetorical analysis of texts while determining techniques of poetic composition. Students will also learn about the lives of authors and the historical context and how these affected the masterpieces studied. Students are expected to actively participate and contribute to class discussion. They are also expected to do all the exercises assigned daily.

*Students must have earned at least 12 credits of Italian language as the course will be instructed in Italian.

CLASSICS

Elementary Latin

Course Code: WL 101
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits: 3

This course provides students with a proficiency-oriented immersion in beginning Latin which is geared primarily toward reading comprehension. Emphasis is on studying the fundamentals of grammar (morphology and syntax) and vocabulary.

Students study basic grammar and learn the essential elements of Latin pronunciation in order to be able to read simple passages in Latin.  

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Pre-Intermediate Latin

Course Code: WL 102
Contact Hours:  45
US Credits:  3

During this course students will gain a mastery of the first principles of Latin grammar that they have studied in Latin I. Students will also study the Latin syntax in order to be able to read quite complex sentences in Latin. The relationship between English and Latin is emphasized in vocabulary building, word derivation, and meanings of prefixes and suffixes. More advanced vocabulary and language structures are presented to students within the context of the themes and topics.

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Introductory Ancient Greek

Course Code: WL 101
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits: 3

This is an introductory course in which you will learn the simplest grammatical concepts and proceed step by step to the more difficult. The Greek course is designed to help you develop proficiency in writing and especially reading Ancient Greek. Such a goal means that you will acquire certain linguistic knowledge and skills (e.g. pronunciation, vocabulary, morphology and syntax), but it also means that you need to understand the culture that produced texts in Greek and used it on a daily basis.

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ARTS AND HUMANITIES

Introductory Writing

Course Code: ENGL103
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

ENGL 103 focuses on the development of skills necessary for reading analytically and writing clear, accurate, coherent expository prose. It also introduces students to basic research skills, library resources, and documentation systems.
This student-centered, inquiry-based writing course is designed to help students throughout their college careers and as they enter communities beyond the college. Inquiry-based writing is designed to engage the student in both problem posing and problem solving. Drawing on the rhetorical situation—specifically, audience, purpose, and context—instruction emphasizes the social nature of inquiry and how writers test ideas to discover the reasons behind and for discursive choices.
Students practice recursive writing processes, such as peer review, in order to help them adapt to changing demands of writing within the college and their lives.

World Literature

Course Code: ENGL203
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

This course acquaints students with significant figures and works of world literature.
We live in a world of fast and fleeting connections. Whether online or offline, we are flooded by images, texts, sounds, videos, status updates, Instagram photos, and other streams of information. Some believe that we are losing the capacity to focus and concentrate, a multitude of others that we are developing new skills and capacities, adapting to digital media in ways that are redefining out relationship to the creation of meaning.
How can “world literature” help to us navigate the predicament of the postmodern present? What can it do for our understanding of where we are, where we’ve been, and where we’re going? What does “world literature” actually mean? Are we talking about a specific canon of texts, or simply a perspective, a methodology, a way of reading literature that transcends national boundaries and opens new networks and modes of understanding? In this course, we’ll tackle these questions by engaging with a number of different texts and genres not just from the Western- European tradition, but also from other cultural and historical traditions across the globe as well. Using an interdisciplinary approach, this course explores a vast range of expression (from inscriptions on ancient tablets to poetry, cinema, and theater), while paying particular attention to the role of genre, media, and narrative in shaping humanity and the human condition.
Class requirements include regular participation, a reading journal, a midterm, a poetry illustration project, and a final exam

History of Art from Ancient Greece to Italian Renaissance

Course Code: ARH 376
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

Art is the highest expression of a culture. Political, historical and social changes lie at the heart of art. Works of art are the reflection of the ages in which they are produced and are often used as a “tool” to carry messages. During our classes we will focus on the study of the development of art during the centuries and how it affects today’s artists. We will have a brief review of the main artistic movements starting from the ancient Greek reaching Italy’s Baroque period.

Student Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course the student will be able to:

  • Interpret a work of art with understanding of its historical and social background;
  • Demonstrate written and oral communication skills in analyzing a piece of art.

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Archaeology Field Study

Course Code: HUM 399
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

Archaeology studies past cultures and societies through their material remains. This course provides a basic introduction to the discipline, focusing on the study of some major Roman cities destroyed by the eruption of Vesuvius in 79 AD. The program combines the archaeological study with the analysis of the historical, economic and social aspects of the Roman culture of the era. Students participate in several site visits to examine the remains and reconstruction of the ancient cities.

Student Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course the student will be able to:

  • know the history of the eruption of Vesuvius in 79 AD and its consequences;
  • understand the characteristic features of Latin civilization (i.e. economy and society) of the second century;
  • analyze the importance of the archaeological heritage of cities such as Pompeii and Herculaneum.

World Geography

Course Code: GEOG200
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

This course is designed to accommodate students who are majoring in Geography but also in other fields and are interested in obtaining a basic familiarization with places throughout the world and geographic concepts.
This course considers how the key concepts of place and space can be used to understand the special character and interactions of history, culture, economics, and the environment in major regions of the world including North America, Europe, Russia, Pacific Rim countries, South Asia, Southwest Asia and North Africa, and Latin America.

Upon completing this class students will be able to:

  • Understand the basic methods of regional geographic research
  • Practice the methods of regional geography by describing the human and physical geography of 8 world regions
  • Analyze aspects of relative geographical position, physical geographic characteristics such as landforms, climate and weather, resources of world regions through class presentations, individual research, and discussions.
  • Interpret human geographic characteristics such as demographics, political organizations, economic conditions, language and religion through class presentations, individual research and discussions

Introduction to Philosophy

Course Code: PHIL101
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

As an introduction to the discipline of philosophy, this course will cover a representative selection of texts and problems in the history of philosophy. The course will address the nature
of philosophical inquiry and the methods it employs. Topics to be discussed include the foundations of ethics, the sources and limits of knowledge and historical approaches to metaphysical speculation. Philosophy is not like other subjects you’ve taken in school. You will not be asked to memorize facts. There are no fundamental principles that all philosophers accept that you must learn and apply, though you will learn principles that particular philosophers have suggested and be asked to think about how(and whether) they apply. The order in which you learn philosophy doesn’t matter that much, though the more philosophy you know, the better you will be at any part of it. The skill of asking questions is much more important than the answers found. Philosophy is analytical and critical, speculative and creative. Philosophy is an activity more than a collection of knowledge, a way life more than an academic subject. The goal of philosophy is combining the creative adventure of ideas with the rigorous analysis of them; it is a serious play with thought.

History of Italian Cinema

Course Code: FVA 276
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

The course introduces the student to the world of Italian Cinema. In the first part the class will be analysing Neorealism, a cinematic phenomenon that deeply influenced the ideological and aesthetic rules of film art. In the second part we will concentrate on the films that mark the decline of Neorealism and the talent of “new” auteurs such as Fellini and Visconti. The last part of the course will be devoted to the cinema from 1970’s to the present in order to pay attention to the latest developments of the Italian industry. The course is a general analysis of post-war cinema and a parallel social history of this period using films as “decoded historical evidence”. Together with masterpieces such as “Open City” and “The Bicycle Thief” the screenings will include films of the Italian directors of the “cinema d’autore” including “The Conformist”, “Life is Beautiful”, “Le conseguenze dell’amore”.

View Syllabus

Drawing on Location, the Art of the Travel Sketchbook

Course Code: ART 375
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

Lectures and field sketching sessions are centered on drawing on location as the best way we have to increase our capacity to observe and to understand reality. An object, a tree, a person, cities or landscapes: during everyday life or while traveling, journaling and sketching from reality is a profound and lasting experience. While drawing, we learn to see and we can select information and highlight details better than we could with a camera. Students will discover Sorrento and its region of Campania, visiting Naples and surrounding archaeological sites, recording their observations through images and words in a travel sketchbook. Freehand drawing and location drawing as basic and complementary skills are recommended; not only among architects, visual artists, animators and graphic designers, but also in disciplines such as archaeology, history, zoology, botany, and geology. Classic drawing exercises, as suggested by authors such as Kimon Nicolaides or Betty Edwards, will also help beginners to break the ice with life drawing and get the most out of the experience.

Introduction to Digital Photography

Course Code: ART 205
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

Introduction to Digital Photography gives students fundamental skills for effectively recording travel, home, and work experiences. Using digital photography as a tool, students are encouraged to become more careful observers of the people, the landscape, the art, the architecture, and the culture that they encounter in their daily lives. The course concentrates on technical lectures and lab/studio time regarding the basic operation of a digital camera and the processing of images. Students develop an understanding of the elements that combine to create powerful visual images: subject matter, composition, color, and light. Through selected readings, assignments, lab/studio time, and critiques, students produce a written and visual final project for the course.

Students are responsible for providing their own cameras, supplies, and image editing software.

The Mafia at the Movies

Course Code: ENGL 212
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

The Mafia is a very complicated historical, cultural, economic, political, and sociological phenomenon. It has its own geography, which is national and international, or, like they say these days, global; as well as its own language and linguistic codes. And it’s been like this ever since day one of its existence, which was when, anyway? Nobody knows as, guess what? nobody knows where the word Mafia really comes from. Actually, nobody knows what the word originally means to begin with. One thing that we know, however, is that the Mafia has always attracted the interest of filmmakers and their box-office-inclined producers. In case you’ve never noticed, crime pays (and pays well).

The Mafia movies that we will watch, analyze, and discuss, deal, either directly or indirectly, with love, death, a complicated notion of the family, sacrifice, violence, sex, religion, symbols, and much, much more than this. Indeed, one of the questions that we will pose during the next three weeks is this: Why a “criminal universe” of this nature has proven itself such a fertile territory for filmmakers? Put it differently, we will also explore the relationship between history and fiction, experience and the reproducibility of the
work of art.

We will look at the Mafia through the prism of Italian and American films, the two historically Mafia’s homelands, and try to discern the differences between two types of cinema that deal with the same genre and, to a very large extent, with the same issues, albeit in different fashion. We will focus especially on the difference between cultural constructs and realities. We will pair our movies with some critical readings in order to read these movies in a comparative fashion and in their historical context. We will try to understand the rise of the “boss” and the cultural formation of the gangster trope from Rico (should I write Edward Robinson) to Michael Corleone (yes, that kid from the West Side of the City, what’s his name?). When we will watch Alberto Lattuada’s Mafioso and Ferdinando di Leo’s Milano Calibro 9 we will attempt to discern how the metaphor North vs. South, a geographical acronym for the Good Boy Crusader vs. the Bad Boys “dagos/terroni/darkies” (women need not to apply, thank you) influences and reflects larger discourses of ethnic and racial hierarchies, geopolitical imperialism, economic subjugation, and that good old myth of our culture—salvation (here’s a hint to explain why women need not to apply). Therefore, we will pay particular attention to the way filmmakers – all of them men – represented women, especially mothers (or women as mothers, if you like) and used them as a constituent part of the discursive and visual constructs about the mob.
Last, but not least, we will ask these apparently easy and yet absurdly complicated questions: How is it that an overwhelming majority of us would rather watch an episode from The Sopranos rather than a National Geographic documentary about global warming? And how did Robert DeNiro manage to switch from murderer and (post)modern Don to a hilarious Italian-American mobster in need of a shrink by the name of Billy Crystal married to one of the girls from Friends– and do it well? What’s happened to you, paesano!!

CULTURAL STUDIES

History of Italian Food and Culture

Course Code: HIST 350
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

In this course we will trace the history of Italian food from a transnational perspective. Challenging nationalist historiographies we will focus on circulation, exchanges, hybridity and mobility.

Borrowing from Edward Said’s notion of “overlapping territories and intertwined histories,” we will discuss how food is part of a stratified and heterogeneous modernity suspended between the local and the global.

Special topics will include: Arab and Asian merchants before the European hegemony; Mediterranean currents; the Columbian exchange; Neapolitan food and the invention of tradition; Italian American food and issues of memory and ethnicity; Food and Southern Italian migrants in northern Italy; food and the boom economico; multiethnic food in contemporary Italy; space and place in connection with food in Italy and the United States. Some works of cinema and popular music will be included.

 

BUSINESS AND ADMINISTRATION STUDIES

Competing in the Global Environment

Course Code: INB 303
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

This course is intended to provide the student with a comprehensive introduction to business in the European Union. The course describes how economic, political and social factors interrelate, and influence business in Europe. Students will use a framework to research sustainable business practices from different European Union member state’s perspective. Guest lecturers and field trips are planned for students enrolled in the study abroad program.

Student Learning Objectives

At the end of the course the student will be able to do the following:

1. Analyze the origins of the EU, its history and development to the point of enlargement.
2. Identify important steps in EU integration, name EU institutions and understand how they interact with one another
3. Analyze the impact of the social and cultural influences brought about by the enlargement of the EU.
4. Determine how business and trade are conducted both internally and externally by the organizations of the EU.
5. Conduct a sustainable business analysis (SWOTS) for a specific industry sector operating in Italy.
6. Analyze how companies should react and position themselves strategically and operationally responding to key issues in Europe’s evolving sustainable business environment.

View Syllabus

Sustainability

Course Code: SUST 335
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

The course aims to analyze the relationship between sustainability, economy, quality and globalization. It will also focus on the European Union and sustainable development. Other included topics will be: the food industry in Italy (focusing on the Campania region), organic farming in Italy, “local food, local market, local business” and food & wine tourism in Italy.
In particular, students will build different business model to answer the following questions:
– The choice of environmental sustainability is compatible with the consumption habits and the
impact on prices?
– How local production can change consumer habits?
– Which may be the effect on local producers?
– What is the “minimum” threshold of sustainability adequately significant, but acceptable for
customers both culturally and economically?

International Tourism: Italian Food and Geography

Course Code: JU 330
Contact Hours: 60
US Credits:  4

The course presents concepts of tourism relating to food and geography, using Italy as its example. The course is relevant to students of all backgrounds but was designed specifically for students of hospitality, business, and culinary arts. Students will study international organizations operating in tourism (i.e. WTO) and the different types of tourism, with particular attention paid to sustainable tourism.

Students will be asked to investigate the tourism geography of Italy, becoming familiar with the most important tourist sites in Italy and Campania (through several excursions). The third module of the course will be dedicated to a very important kind of tourism in Italy and of the Campania: Food and Wine Tourism.

Entrepreneurship and the New Economy

Course Code: ENT 481
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

The focus is the study of the entrepreneur and the entrepreneurial start-up process. Areas of concentration include the search for new venture opportunities, evaluation of the viability and attractiveness of the new venture; determining the resources required and the sources of those resources and the development of a business plan appropriate for presentation to funding sources.

COURSE AND PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES

Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to demonstrate the following:

  • Identify the role of the entrepreneur in a market economy;
  • Through a written report and presentation, demonstrate understanding of various components of entrepreneurial activity in practice;
  • Apply economic reasoning as it relates to policies impacting entrepreneurship;
  • Explain the impact of various institutions on entrepreneurial activity in the short run and long run;
  • Evaluate various public policies for their effect on entrepreneurial activity.

View Syllabus

Principles of Marketing

Course Code: MKG 301
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

This course provides an introduction to basic marketing concepts. Topics include the marketing mix, new product development, consumer behavior, customer relationship management, strategic planning and e-commerce. Students will develop a comprehensive marketing plan and apply course concepts to real or imaginary products.

Learning Goals
The content of this course addresses the following goals:

  • Professional competency and professional identity
  • Strong communication and interpersonal skills
  • Diverse and global perspectives
  • Commitment to ethical practices and service

SERVICE LEARNING

Introduction to Civic Engagement

Course Code: JU303
Contact Hours:  45
US Credits:  3

Introduction to Civic Engagement, a community-based learning course, is designed to give students a basic understanding of key concepts and the framework of civic engagement. Students will critically examine university-community relationships, power structures and the concept of privilege. They will be exposed to different types of civic engagement, through direct service opportunities and by researching specific case studies. Throughout all class discussions and assignments, students will be asked to engage in critical reflection.

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Introduction to Sociology

Course Code: SOC 203
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

Our focus on “sociological imagination” will help us unravel the visible and invisible relationship between social/collective contexts and private domains.

Further, we will examine this relationship between social contexts and personal concerns as dynamic and rooted in historical processes, rather than being stagnant and unchanging. Specifically, we will focus on categories and processes shaped by social time and space.

So for example, we will examine questions like: what is gender and how is this idea shaped by social processes? We will ask similar questions with respect to other socially created categories such as race, ethnicity, economic status, political identity etc. An underlying theme of our course will be to keep in mind the developments and challenges ushered in by new technologies and processes of globalization in the 21st century.

World Religions

Course Code: RELG 101
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

Since religion has been, is and will continue to be a powerful and perennial force in human culture, this course provides the opportunity for the student to gain an in-depth insight into the diversity of religions throughout the world in terms of their history, world-views, practices, goals and ideals. Whether we distance ourselves from religious traditions or embrace them, we cannot avoid the influence of religious ideas, practices, images, languages and values in our everyday life, work and play. The course will examine the Buddhist, Christian, Confucian, Hindu, Islamic, Jewish, and Shinto traditions.
This class will contextualize world religions within the larger contours of human history and relevant issues from comparative religious studies, so the student will learn to recognize and find meanings in a variety of religious expressions while discovering that misinterpretations of these religious expressions can lead to inaccuracies, stereotypes and distortions. Attitudes of respect and appreciation for religious diversity are encouraged throughout the course. By studying some primary sources, the student will begin to appreciate the complex history of each religion.
The comparison of different religions will help students synthesize the basic elements of all religions. By the end of the course, students should have a better understanding and tolerance for the idiosyncrasies of the different religions and appreciate the people and cultures through which these religions are manifest.

History of Contemporary Italy

Course Code: HIST 350
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

In this course, students will examine Italian history, beginning with the end of World War II and the birth of the Italian Republic. The clashes between various political parties, the Cold War, the economic boom and terrorism in the 1970s will also be analyzed. Students will later examine the political degeneration of the 80s, “Tangentopoli” and the new political system in the Berlusconi era. Particular attention will be devoted to foreign policy, focusing on Italy’s role in the international arena with an emphasis on the European unification process with Italy as a leading country. The faculty will generate a critical discussion on these topics, inviting students to think independently about the causes and consequences of the events that they study. Students are expected to actively participate and contribute to class discussion. Evaluation will include two written exams and one 5 page research paper.

View Syllabus

History of the Mafia

Course Code: HIST 350
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

The course examines the history of southern Italian organized crime syndicates from their origins to the present day. It also focuses on how these mafias work and have succeeded, on their activities as well as on modern-day approaches to combating the criminal presence in Italy, including the reaction of civil society organizations.

Attention is paid to examples of Mafia enterprises, its past and present role in politics, and its evolution from a regional organization to one with an international reach. A research project, with both a paper and an oral presentation, is required in addition to two written exams.

Student Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course the student will be able to:

  • discuss the historical origins of the Mafia;
  • describe how the Mafia works and the tactics it has used to succeed;
  • discuss past and present Mafia enterprises;
  • describe the role the Mafia has and does play in Italian politics;
  • critically examine the different approaches used to combat the Mafia;
  • describe the evolution of the Mafia from an organization that was regional in scope to one today that has international reach;
  • employ basic research techniques to locate, evaluate and synthesize information from a variety of sources.

Western Civilization since 1648

Course Code: HIST 165
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

This course provides an introduction to the political, intellectual, cultural, and economic features of Western civilization from the early modern period to the mid-twentieth century. The topics covered will include the roots of Western Civilization, Enlightenment, French Revolution and Napoleon, Industrial Revolution, Liberalism, Romanticism, Nationalism, Socialism, Imperialism, the First World War, Totalitarianism, World War II, postWar Europe, the rise of Western feminism, post modernism and the current communications revolution, and globalization trends.

Anthropology of Europe

Course Code: JU 330
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

This course will examine cultural diversity in contemporary Europe as the continent struggles to compete in an evolving global environment. Students will explore many different aspects of Europe today including issues relating to the development of the European Union and to gender, migration, religion, nationalism, crime, food and social innovation.

Student Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course the student will be able to do the following:

1. Discuss the values of and challenges faced by the European Union today.
2. Describe the power of organized crime and its impact on European governance.
3. Identify the main gender issues facing the continent today and discuss possible remedies.
4. Describe the history and goals of European nationalist organizations extant today.
5. Analyze the role of religion in today’s Europe.
6. Discuss past and present patterns of migration to and from Europe.
7. Discuss how social innovation is changing European economies and societies.
8. Describe both the cultural and the economic meaning of food in Europe today.

View Syllabus

Mediterranean Culture and History

Course Code: IS 305
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

The goal of this course (45 contact hours, 3 credits) is to offer a wide introduction to the main evolution of the Mediterranean, using not just history but its cultures, religions and peoples as well. The main topics covered are: Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Greece, Rome, Germanics, Byzantines, the Atlantic and the Mediterranean, the Renaissance, the different Mediterranean families and the Modernization of the Mediterranean Societies. These topics will not be covered chronologically but by item. Although each lecture will maintain a chronological structure. At the end of each module, students will be invited to prepare and present oral presentations covering one of the topics of the module.

At the end of the course, students will write a 15-page essay concerning one of the topics studied during the course.

International Politics

Course Code: POL 208
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

This course is an introduction to the field of International Relations. The first module of the course will present the major theoretical frameworks developed and employed to analyze of world politics. Thinking in terms of theory is the only way to ponder over international dynamics and processes in an informed and proper way.

The second part of the course will refer to those theories in order to make sense and discuss some of the major themes currently pertaining to world politics: international security, globalization, transnational terrorism, human rights, with a strong focus on development cooperation and the issues related to migrants/refugees (module C).

View Syllabus

Human Rights

Course Code: POL 375
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

The purpose of this module is to examine the history, development, structure and efficacy of international human rights law. In this module, students will investigate the legal framework of the United Nations and regional systems relating to the protection and promotion of, inter alia, the rights of minorities and indigenous peoples, women’s rights, the rights of migrants and refugees, cultural rights, and the emerging field of environmental rights. Students will assess the remedies that exist for violations of human rights law in the various systems and examine practical case studies where relevant.
On completion of the course the students will be able to:
‐ Compare the international human rights law system and regional human rights law systems;
‐ Evaluate the various mechanisms and procedures for human rights law enforcement;
‐ Critically assess specific areas of international human rights law with reference to relevant legal instruments and contemporary cases;
‐ Acquire basic competency in legal writing and research.

Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies: History, Theory, Practice

Course Code: WGS 201
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

This interdisciplinary course provides students with an introduction to the theories and methods used
in gender studies. Through the examination of a variety of topics, students will explore the ways that
gender shapes societies and cultures historically and throughout the world.

Student Learning Outcomes:

1. Students will demonstrate creative thinking by linking content and insights from multiple disciplines;
2. In written, oral, and/or visual communication, students will communicate in a manner appropriate to audience and occasion, with an evident message and organization structure;
3. Students will demonstrate awareness of societal and/or civic issues;
4. Students will understand and practice academic honesty.
5. Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the interconnectedness of global dynamics (issues, processes, trends, and systems)

SCIENCES and NATURAL SCIENCES

Introduction to Geology

Course Code: JU 330
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

The course aims to give an introduction to the science of geology. In particular, the main types of rocks are analyzed with an emphasis on genetic processes and in relationship to plate tectonics theory. This basic knowledge will provide a background to understand and study the main geological risks, such as volcanoes, earthquakes, floods, and landslides. Specific examples from the Apennines mountain chain and Campanian plain will be examined to contextualize these topics in the Italian environment. In addition, a significant aim of this course is for students to gain a conscious relationship with the environment. The Campania region is an ideal place for experiential learning via site visits, with the opportunity for students to witness a wide range of geological features. The evaluation for the course will include mid-term and final written exams, a presentation and graphical exercises.

Introduction to Volcanology

Course Code: JU 330
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

The course is an introduction to the main elements of geological sciences including stratigraphy laws, the main types of rocks, and an understanding of faults and folds. These elements will be used to understand Plate Tectonics theory. Using this theory, different kinds of volcanoes will be analyzed, examining different magmatic compositions, igneous and pyroclastic rocks, and their geodynamic environments. The role of geologic and geomorphologic processes will be analyzed in reference to volcanic risk. This course will also study landslides in volcanic soils (the case of Sarno mountains) and groundwater flow in volcanic aquifers and exploitation of thermal waters (the case of Ischia).

Introduction to Marine Biology

Course Code: MSC 113
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

This course focuses on the biology of organisms residing in the sea, from the diversity of planktonic communities to marine megafauna, taking into consideration the ecological principles that govern marine life. The course aims to provide a solid educational background in basic and applied marine biology. Emphasis will be placed on marine environment issues and the adaptive and evolutionary mechanisms of organisms that allow them to occupy marine habitats. In particular, the Mediterranean Sea will play a central role in the course subjects, profiting from the availability of unique ecosystems and a nearby renowned marine research institute to conduct thematic field trips and practical tutorials.

REQUIREMENTSbring a mask and a snorkel for Marine Bio field trips.

Marine Conservation

Course Code: MSC 430
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

This course will focus on the key principles of marine conservation biology, analyzing the main threats for the organisms and ecosystems that inhabit the world oceans, from the marine pollution and bio-invasions to the serious problem of fisheries and ocean over-exploitation. In the second part of the course, students will study the most important conservation approaches (fishery management, species and habitat conservation measures, etc.) and the Marine Protected Area strategies to maintain and restore the natural equilibrium. Conservation biology emerged as a recognized field of mission-oriented scholarship about a half century ago when many terrestrial ecologists, geneticists and systematists were horrified by the gathering momentum of a great planetary extinction event. After 50 years many conservation strategies reported good data in recovering population and restoring ecosystem.

Marine Biology of the Mediterranean

Course Code: MSC 189
Contact Hours: 60
US Credits:  4

Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week modified for Sant’Anna Summer II term with Dr. Quinton White. Introductory level with no prerequisites required. Students should be able to swim and snorkel. Discover the marine biology of the Mediterranean while focusing on the Bay of Naples and Sorrento at the Sant’ Anna Institute while using multimedia techniques of underwater photography and videography for multimedia.

ONLY OFFERED IN SUMMER II 2019

COMMUNICATION

Introduction to Multimedia Journalism in the Mediterranean

Course Code: COMM 217
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

Three-hour course with Dr. Annmarie Kent-Willette. Introductory level with no prerequisites required. Students should be able to swim and snorkel. In this course you’ll gain first-hand experience while cultivating multi-media journalism skills through the study and application of the fundamentals of basic multimedia journalism. Project work and subject matter will focus on life in the Sorrentine Peninsula and the Amalfi Coast.

ONLY OFFERED IN SUMMER II 2019

International Multimedia Journalism: Communication, Culture, and the Amalfi Coast

Course Code: COMM 452/ IS 305
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

Students can chose to enroll in the course as COMM or IS credits (not both). This course International Multimedia Journalism: Communication, Culture, and the Amalfi Coast will use multimedia journalism and storytelling (including video, online media, social media, traditional articles, blogs and photography) while living in Sorrento, to study experience, and understand the culture, history, and society of southern Italy, the Campania Region, and the Amalfi Coast.

ONLY OFFERED IN SUMMER I 2019

History of the Mafia

Course Code: HIST 350
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits:  3

The course examines the history of southern Italian organized crime syndicates from their origins to the present day. It also focuses on how these mafias work and have succeeded, on their activities as well as on modern-day approaches to combating the criminal presence in Italy, including the reaction of civil society organizations.

Attention is paid to examples of Mafia enterprises, its past and present role in politics, and its evolution from a regional organization to one with an international reach. A research project, with both a paper and an oral presentation, is required in addition to two written exams.

Student Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course the student will be able to:

  • discuss the historical origins of the Mafia;
  • describe how the Mafia works and the tactics it has used to succeed;
  • discuss past and present Mafia enterprises;
  • describe the role the Mafia has and does play in Italian politics;
  • critically examine the different approaches used to combat the Mafia;
  • describe the evolution of the Mafia from an organization that was regional in scope to one today that has international reach;
  • employ basic research techniques to locate, evaluate and synthesize information from a variety of sources.

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