PAROS ISLAND, GREECE

COURSE CATALOG

PAROS ISLAND COURSES

FIND YOUR COURSES

Courses in Paros Island fill up VERY QUICKLY, so be sure to register as early as possible to maximize your chances at getting in the courses you need. You can register once you are accepted into the program.

(Browse courses by expanding the sections below to reveal course codes, credits, descriptions and syllabi if available.)

Please note, courses are subject to change.

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The Art Workshop; Intermediate Painting

Course Code:  ARTP 211
Contact Hours:  60-90
US Credits:  3

The Art Workshop aims to deepen the student’s knowledge of painting by studying intensely such elements as light, color, composition & texture. It offers expanded practice in the basic concepts of painting, exploring a variety of approaches, media, processes and experimentation. The class will enhance the student’s understanding of developing a painting both physically as well as conceptually, and expose the student to different genres of the vocabulary of painting, from the traditional objective through the non-objective. Class trips to museums, islands, and villages will help students learn not only about past Greek art, but also let them experience contemporary Greek society, art, music, and passion for life. In keeping with the spirit of an individually oriented studio construct, students are encouraged to explore and experiment with their own talent and vision. Methods for the exploration of the visual arts may include: a look into the practical methods of working to an artistic solution while maintaining insight into the professional career applications of one’s art; an experimental consideration of the possibilities offered by the latest developments in artistic theory and practice; development of deeper critical thinking as to both one’s own product and that of others working in the same field/s; ongoing critical analysis of work through individual and group critiques.

Creative Writing Workshop

Course Code:  ENGL/COMM 331
Contact Hours:  45
US Credits:  3

The creative writing program at HISA is designed to aid writers in developing the personal voice and style of creative work that can help them achieve their goals. Specifically, the course work is arranged around each individual writer’s current project, whether it be poetry or prose, and in any genre he/she is working in. The goal for writing majors is the completion of a manuscript of poetry or short prose, and/or a significant segment a longer prose work. Each week, students will submit new writing for open, non-judgmental critique and discuss in a small workshop setting the ideas and feelings they possess about writing and how it relates to their lives. Questions on “craft” will be examined from different points of view, but no hierarchy of style or manner will be favored. The teachers are all currently writing and publishing and actively involved with elements of style, editing, voice, narration techniques, etc. Students are encouraged to work closely with the teachers, as mentors, in one on one sessions, in addition to class. The teachers can aid students in forming writing projects—fiction, non-fiction, travel, poetry in all forms—and work along with them to solve programs and develop a strong sense of craft. Surveys of writers and their work supplement the development of writing projects and can add knowledge and inspiration. A further and important element, is the immersion aspect of the HISA program, whereby writers can reach into and enjoy the substantial history and culture they are living and learning in, enriching the content and energy of their work.

Cross Disciplinary Philosophy / Life Themes

Course Code: PHIL 210
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits: 3

A survey discussion that explores and evaluates the sources of knowing, believing, and existing. Rather than a traditional survey of philosophers and their writings, the course calls upon each student to examine where his/her moral, ethical, spiritual, political and romantic belief systems originate: how and why we lead our lives the way we do. Fundamental to Life Themes is a challenge to preconceived notions of what we accept as Truth, and in particular preconceived notions of “correctness” in morality, ethics, taboo, loyalty, sacrifice, sex, and social and family relations. To explore and expand our knowledge of experience and knowing, we will look at contrasting beliefs and experiences to our own. In conjunction with this, students will visit with and interview members of the Greek community, journey into remote villages and experience firsthand the ethics and nature of life in the Cycladic countryside, thus obtaining a direct interactive experience of a culture whose communal, religious, and artistic philosophical “templates” are both deeply-rooted and at the same time in a state of flux due to the influences of an ever-encroaching global pressure.

Film Studies: From Literature to Film

Course Code:  FILM/COMM 321
Contact Hours:  45
US Credits:  3

This course is designed to alert students to the various ways in which works of literature (novel, short story, and play) are translated to the screen. A selection of films drawn from different literary genres will be considered in order to gain a sense of the historical development of literature and cinema. Students will learn to critique the disparate elements of acting, direction, and in particular the script, while lectures and class discussions will examine how the screenwriter has selected, edited, or changed the literary text. An in-depth exploration will be made into why such choices have been made and consider the effectiveness of such adaptations. Particular emphasis will be placed upon the patterning of thought and theme, evoking a cross-disciplinary analysis of the archetypes central to the Literature and Creative Writing courses. Students will learn to view film and literature as synergistic art forms, appreciating the differences and convergence of the narrative method in both disciplines, thus deepening their critical abilities.

Black & White Photography

Course Code:  PHOT 311
Contact Hours:  60-90
US Credits:  3

Covers both fundamentals and further explorations in B&W analogue photography. The departure point for the class is our encounter with new cultures and peoples. Projects are designed to allow students to focus on various aspects of the new environments. There is a choice of projects designed to allow students to try a variety of approaches. Technically, the class functions somewhat like a workshop where different students may be working in very diverse ways. Some students may work with traditional black and white documentary images, others making collages and personal or impressionistic studies . The course will offer numerous demonstrations of a variety of techniques and processes which students can choose to use for one or more of the projects. Students will be encouraged to develop a personal point of view and unique vision of their experiences. The importance of research and development, as well as in-depth work in the darkroom will be emphasized in student projects. Students will have the opportunity to work more closely with a tutor as well as have the chance to work on more independent projects of their own. In addition, the unique cultural exploratory components of this course will enable each student to personalize his/her vision and mode of expression, develop and enhance visual thinking, and provide photographic interaction with Greece and Greek culture: historical and present-day.

Digital Imaging

Course Code: DIGT 211
Contact Hours: 60-90
US Credits: 3

For the student who has conventional photography experience, this class is intended as a solid grounding in digital imaging techniques, but aims as well to move forward students who have some acquaintance with artistic digital photography. General procedures related to new technology and equipment including digital photography and digital manipulations, Photoshop and video editing software basics, input and output options will be covered. The course will provide a background for contemporary thought about digital images, including a survey of current artists working with digital techniques and a discussion of these practices in terms of conceptual questions of documentation, reproduction, what is “live,” self-expression, and theories of objectivity. The current parameters of digital practice will be questioned and students will examine its potential integration into other media. We will question how digital technology might alter perception in terms of simultaneity, continuity, speed of attention, and ideas of truth. Emphasis will be to use the island as an inspiration for new ways of seeing. Over the course of the term, students will be encouraged to identify an emerging personal inquiry in the body of work produced. This inquiry will be written in a statement at the end of the term. Studio critiques will provide feedback for these artistic investigations. During critiques, students will be challenged to explore their content’s relation to its medium and to refine their perspective.

Studio for Interrelated Media

Course Code:  ARTS 311
Contact Hours:  60-90
US Credits:  3

This intensive inter-disciplinary arts studio class is designed to help students focus their experiential and creative study abroad experience within the context of their Greek island historical, cultural and artistic environment. We will experiment with found object/material, sculpture, architecture, painting, photographs, video, sound, performance, and other phenomenological occurrences. Installations, site specific projects, and other richly layered video and collage works may be created using a variety of techniques and approaches. Mixed-media projects, painting and drawing, digital still and video film, graphic art constructions and installations, will all form part of the student’s semester of study. Also inherent will be lectures and instruction concerning website design and online presentation of art and installation projects, leading to the student’s own career objectives. With an eye on depth of content, as well as exploratory and investigative approaches, basic themes may be drawn from personal experiences, archetypal literary patterns, philosophical and spiritual beliefs.

Literature: Writers in Ancient Greece

Course Code: ENGL/HIST 321
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits: 3

‘Sing to me of the man, Muse … start from where you will—sing for our time too.’ Homer has been doing just that for about 2700 years. It is impossible to consider the canon of Western literature without acknowledging the debt owed Homer. In addition to the entertainment value of action and romance told through the depiction of many complex characters — archetypal characters who are yet enigmatic and beyond archetypal boundaries — we have the gift of brilliant architecture and and a clear, direct and absolute control of narrative. We also have the gift of insight: through Homer, writing in the Archaic age about a mythic Heroic age, we get a glimpse of how the ancient Greeks viewed their world. How human beings behaved towards one another was a matter not only of whether or not one survived in Homer’s time, but how one was spoken of in perpetuity. In his story — a weaving together of many old tales — Homer introduces us to Greek ethical and cultural traditions the development of which we chart in the rest of the work read during the semester. During the course of the semester, in three units — Unit 1: Epic Poetry: Homer’s The Odyssey; Unit 2: Archilochus and Sappho: The Emergence of the Personal Voice; and Unit 3: The Great Tragic Poets.

Cycladic Art and Culture (Historical Sites in the eastern Mediterranean)

Course Code:  ARTH/SOCL 320
Contact Hours:  45
US Credits:  3

In an attempt to deepen students’ understanding and appreciation of the rich cultural history of the Eastern Mediterranean world where they are spending the semester, visits are made to important Cycladic island sites as well as museums where appropriate. For each excursion there is a pre-visit preparation by a teacher or contributing artist, historian, folklorist or mythographer in order that participants can receive the maximum benefit from their visit. Primary emphasis is given to myth, history, event and classical religious traditions within the context of Greek, Western, and Global History rather than art history per se. Temple sites of the gods and goddesses are predominant, but visits include archaeological sites, marble quarries, and museums that showcase ancient sculpture, jewelry, artifacts, as well as later Byzantine and Venetian times. Students who will be augmenting their art and cultural immersion with creative work of their own will have the HISA art studio available for their use, and access to HISA core teaching staff in those areas for small group or one-on-one guidance.

Women's Studies: Goddesses of Ancient Greece

Course Code: WGST/HIST 320
Contact Hours: 45
US Credits: 3

The objective of this course is to give an in-depth understanding of the great feminine divinities of Ancient Greece and of what they might represent, for the ancients as well as for ourselves in the 21st century. Many of the notions and concepts that are relevant to the Greek goddesses will be studied. In particular, participants of the course will question how the notion of the feminine has been constructed and translated through myth, and review both the speculative and historical record of the shift from worship of the Goddess over time to sky-god, patriarchal religion/s. In order to do that, coursework will examine works of art and literature that deal with the different aspects of the Goddess, not simply her displacement, but the different ways she is portrayed and referenced – both positively and negatively. A great part of the course lectures are centered around Classical Greece, aimed at taking advantage of the location in which students are studying. An attempt is made to cover a certain sweep of eras and countries to give an indication of how various and profoundly omni-present is the idea of the female Deity.

Modern Greek Language I

Course Code:  MDGR 111
Contact Hours:  45
US Credits:  3

This course is an introduction to Modern Greek language in the first of two sequential semester classes. It is designed for students wishing to learn Greek as it is written and spoken in Greece today. As well as learning the basic grammar and the skills necessary to read texts of moderate difficulty and to converse on a wide range of topics, students explore the Modern Greek cultural landscape and living habits, participating in field trips as part of their assignments. Thus, this introduction to the language aids a cultural immersion into the whole of contemporary Greek society.

Modern Greek Language II

Course Code:  MDGR 212
Contact Hours:  45
US Credits:  3

This course is an introduction to Modern Greek language in the second of two sequential semester classes. This course deepens students’ familiarity with the formal aspects of the language and broadens their vocabulary. Students will progress beyond the basic level of competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, as well as participate in cultural activities outside the classroom.

As well as learning the basic grammar and the skills necessary to read texts of moderate difficulty and to converse on a wide range of topics, students explore the Modern Greek cultural landscape and living habits, participating in field trips as part of their assignments. Thus, this introduction to the language aids a cultural immersion into the whole of contemporary Greek society. Building on the fundamental linguistic constructs of the Modern Greek language, a communicative methodology is employed to get students speaking Greek in a natural way within their environment as soon as possible. Classroom exercises are applied in a “real world” arena at once, as the teacher walks the village streets with the group interacting with the community.

Theory of Art

Course Code:  ARTH 310
Contact Hours:  45
US Credits:  3

This course aims to expose students to the ideas and beliefs of other artists in order to help clarify their sense of what it means to be an artist today, and to further enlighten the daily work done in the studio by enabling students to develop their own critical and theoretical points of view. Students will learn to sharpen the verbal, analytical, and presentation skills needed to present one’s ideas and work and/or pursue a concurrent career in museum or gallery work, writing criticism, collecting or cataloguing artworks, or teaching art history. Methods used will include a teacher/student collaborative investigation into why different artists structure their vision the way they do, and an in-depth exploration of artists’ perceptions of their own work, through autobiographical writings, films, and music. Discussion sessions will also center on the personal themes and beliefs that each student feels are central to their own art.

Cycladic Art and Culture

Course Code:  ARTH/SOCL 320
Contact Hours:  45
US Credits:  3

An intense, action-filled two week encounter with Paros and selected neighboring islands that unlocks the secret authenticity of Cycladic rural life. Journey along infrequently traveled Byzantine trails to remote villages and mountain farms, as well as ancient caves and marble quarries, historic monasteries and ruins. Unearth a humanistic island archeology beyond the textbook or tour. When not capturing your own impressions on paper or film, see how Paros’s modern sculptors, artists and ceramists work to build on a continuity from ancient Greek culture, and attend evening performances of music and dance.

This specially designed course allows students of Drawing and Painting, Creative Writing, and Photography, to work on their own art, while also experiencing the wonders and excitement of an historic culture. Includes visits to Delos, Myconos, Antiparos, Naxos, and overnight in Santorini.

Digital Imaging

Course Code:  DIGT 211
Contact Hours:  60-90
US Credits:  3

This class is intended as an introduction to digital imaging techniques but aims as well to move forward students who have some acquaintance with artistic digital photography. Exposure to new technology and equipment including digital photography and digital manipulations, Photoshop and video editing software basics are covered. Students will learn new techniques that advance their expressive range and capabilities. Students will manipulate their images and explore the technical illusions of movement and animation. This course provides a background for contemporary thought about digital images particularly within the Greek pantheon of photography, and photography in general. It includes a survey of current artists working with digital technologies, including visits to galleries and studios on Paros. Photo excursions will be held that help students become acquainted with unique cultural and natural conditions for shooting photographs on Paros. A discussion of photographic practices in terms of conceptual questions of documentation, reproduction, what is “live”, self-expression, and theories of objectivity. The current parameters of digital practice will be questioned and students will examine its potential integration into other media. We will question how digital technology might alter perception in terms of simultaneity, continuity, speed of attention, and ideas of truth.

Creative Writing Workshop I

Course Code:  ENGL/COMM 331
Contact Hours:  45
US Credits:  3

Creative Writing Summer Course is an intensive interactive course designed to encourage writers to discover and experiment with their own voice. The course will assist the student’s exploration into the realm of his/her own creative resources, away from the dependence on learned voices or the weighty impressions of the “great writers.” To aid in this process of discovery, students perform spontaneous writing exercises in class and experiment with persona, voice, and character. Each week, students will submit new writing for open, non-judgmental critique and will discuss in a small workshop setting the ideas and feelings they possess about writing and how it relates to their lives. Questions on “craft” will be examined from different points of view, and no hierarchy of style or manner will be imposed.

Over the course, we will read and discuss the work of writers whose travel in other lands, especially Greece, has affected, and in a significant way created the essence of their poems and prose. How does the nature of our travel to a new place impact our writing? How does the heart respond to its new environment? An ongoing element of the workshop will involve our own writing: a search for a new vantage point adding new windows to our perspective.

Cycladic Art and Culture

Course Code:  ARTH/SOCL 320
Contact Hours:  45
US Credits:  3

An intense, action-filled two week encounter with Paros and selected neighboring islands that unlocks the secret authenticity of Cycladic rural life. Journey along infrequently traveled Byzantine trails to remote villages and mountain farms, as well as ancient caves and marble quarries, historic monasteries and ruins. Unearth a humanistic island archeology beyond the textbook or tour. When not capturing your own impressions on paper or film, see how Paros’s modern sculptors, artists and ceramists work to build on a continuity from ancient Greek culture, and attend evening performances of music and dance.

This specially designed course allows students of Drawing and Painting, Creative Writing, and Photography, to work on their own art, while also experiencing the wonders and excitement of an historic culture. Includes visits to Delos, Myconos, Antiparos, Naxos, and overnight in Santorini.

Black and White Photography

Course Code:  PHOT 311
Contact Hours:  60-90
US Credits:  3

The departure point for the class is our encounter with new cultures and sights. During the course of the term we will be exposed to intriguing new landscapes and people. This offers a wonderful opportunity for exploration into the world and people around us as well as our perceptions. There is always an important element of self-discovery in every artistic project, and this will be a vital component of this class. Projects are designed to allow students to explore various aspects of their environment. Students will be encouraged to move beyond the stereotypical perceptions of the modern Greek and European world and to develop a more personal and unique vision of their experiences. There will be a choice of projects designed to allow students to try a variety of approaches.

Class time will include consideration of a wide variety of photographic work to help clarify project goals and possible approaches as well as to inspire students in their own endeavors. Similarly, there will be technical demonstrations, group and individual critiques, field trips to shoot photographs, lab time as well as video lectures, class discussions relating to readings handed out or questions asked of students to write about.

Creative Writing Workshop II

Course Code:  ENGL/COMM 332
Contact Hours:  45
US Credits:  3

Creative Writing Workshop II is an intensive workshop in creative prose and poetry, traditional and non-traditional, centered on student work and tailored to the interests and current projects of the workshop members. Selected course readings will be decided on jointly at the start of the course and reflect the critical and creative demands and interests of the workshop members, though all course texts must be read in their entirety and thoroughly discussed and analyzed. Course work will concentrate on the writing and editing of student work with a view to increasing the length and complexity of prose pieces towards the goal of the novel. Poetry manuscripts should go to thirty accomplished pieces and must be prepared for submission to publishers. No particular style is to be enforced and student writing is free to range as imagination, talent, and ambition dictate. Risk-taking is encouraged, as well as serious self-reflection on writing content and design.

Each week workshop members will offer for discussion portions of their work and provide copies of selected works for member evaluation, comment and suggested editing points. In addition, workshop members will be asked to lead discussions of other students’ manuscripts and to prepare a detailed written critique of each manuscript under discussion. The aim, again, is to produce already maturely scrutinized works that can be sent to agents and publishers with some confidence, and a positive attitude towards rejection, revision and criticism.

The Summer Art Workshop: Painting

Course Code:  ARTP 211
Contact Hours:  60-90
US Credits:  3

The Summer Art Workshop aims to enhance the student’s understanding of developing a painting both physically as well as conceptually.” Students are encouraged to develop their own artistic visions, and enabled by the technical proficiency and practical knowledge of HISA’s working-artist instructors. Art workshop students are also encouraged to explore Greek culture and environment and to incorporate their new experiences and perspective into their creative craft. Trips to nearby islands such as Naxos, Santorini and Delos, among other significant cultural and historical destinations reveal the origins of classical Greek art that have essentially contributed to aesthetic ideals and artistic theory. Students can broaden their perspective of the historical spectrum of painting and deepen their understanding and engagement in their own creations.

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