PAROS ISLAND, GREECE

COURSE CATALOG

PAROS ISLAND COURSES CATALOG

FIND YOUR COURSES

Below you will find the courses offered in Paros Island, Greece.

Please note, courses are subject to change.

PAROS ISLAND FULL SITE

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ART HISTORY – RENAISSANCE TO THE MODERN (available upon request)3 credits
This course is an exploration into the major accomplishments of Western art (painting, sculpture and architecture) from the Renaissance through the Modern era. Both art and architecture were intimately integrated into every facet of the pre-modern person’s world, actively part of and used in daily life, and reflected and shaped the culture for which it was created. With this in mind, we will examine not only great monuments and artists, but also contextual issues concerning the nature of the creative experience, art in the life of the individual and of society including religious, political, economic and social conditions that existed at specific moments in time. The course will be centered on lectures with class discussions and require extensive reading of assigned texts throughout the semester. Students who enroll in this course are not required to have prior knowledge of art history.
ART WORKSHOP: PAINTING3 credits
This course aims to further the understanding of painting by studying such elements as light, color, composition & texture. There will be expanded practice in the basic concepts of painting, exploring it through a variety of approaches, media, processes and experimentation. The class will develop the student’s understanding of developing a painting both physically as well as conceptually. The student will be exposed to different genres of the vocabulary of painting, from the traditional objective through the non-objective. Class trips to museums, islands, villages will help students learn not only about past Greek art, but also will become a way to learn about contemporary Greek life, art, music, and passion for life. The teacher will help students channel these new experiences into inspired and searching paintings.
AMERICAN LITERATURE 1865-PRESENT (available upon request)3 credits
This course will survey major trends and writers in American literature from the end of the Civil War to the present. The course will examine the shift in the late 19th century from Romanticism to Realism and Naturalism and the 20th century experiments of Modernism and Post-Modernism. The course is structured as a chronological survey beginning with the poetry of Walt Whitman and Emily Dickenson, and continuing on to include what is generally perceived as the peak verse period in the mid 20th century with the rise of Stevens, Pound, Elliot, Williams and others. The Beat Generation and contemporary writers of today, in both poetry and prose will also be read and discussed in class, including examples from “alternative” voices, such as immigrants, native Americans, minority groups, and social and life-style activists. With respect to the rise of the American novel, participants will first examine the upheaval in literary manners exemplified by the struggle between the Romantics, the Realists and the Naturalists. The works of Emerson, Twain, Henry James, Frank Norris and others, will help students to indentify some of the moral and ethical roots of the American novel. While the great proliferation of American writers, male and female, in early to mid 20th century presents a daunting task to the student of literature, students will through careful selection be able to glean the various essences of the modern novel. Fitzgerald, Hemingway and Faulkner, will start parcipants off on a journey into the works of selected others, chosen for their social, political, or experimental works. Major writers of focus will include Toni Morrison, Saul Bellow, John Updike and Issac Singer.
ART WORKSHOP: ADVANCED PAINTING3 credits
This studio course is designed for students who have a solid grounding in drawing and painting, in both the theory and practical aspects of visual art, and who want to develop and produce a researched and coherent body of work. The course will help students develop work which addresses in an incisive and in-depth manner the fundamental plastic properties of 2D art as well as the theoretical, aesthetic issues painters face today. Students will be encouraged to develop a personal point of view fusing an exploration and understanding of methods and materials with a philosophical, aesthetic position. The importance of research and development, leading to in-depth studio work, will also be emphasized, as will an understanding of the differences and similarities between North American and European contemporary art and culture, plus how American students in Europe are influenced by and position themselves within that polarization in the case of Study Abroad students. Prior art theory and/or art history course/s or the Theories of Art class at HISA is a prerequisite.
CYCLADIC ART & CULTURE2/3 credits
An intense, one-of-a-kind educational encounter with Paros and selected neighboring islands that unlocks the secret authenticity of Cycladic rural life. Journey along infrequently traveled Byzantine trails to remote villages and mountain farms, as well as ancient caves and marble quarries, historic monasteries and ruins. Unearth a humanistic island archeology beyond the textbook or tour. When not capturing your own impressions on paper or film, see how Paros’s modern sculptors, artists and ceramists work to build on a continuity from ancient Greek culture, and attend evening performances of music and dance.
WOMEN’S STUDIES: GODDESSES OF ANCIENT GREECE3 credits
The objective of this course is to give an in-depth understanding of the great feminine divinities of Ancient Greece and of what they might represent, for the ancients as well as for ourselves in the 21st century. Many of the notions and concepts that are relevant to the Greek goddesses will be studied. In particular, participants of the course will question how the notion of the feminine has been constructed and translated through myth, and review both the speculative and historical record of the shift from worship of the Goddess over time to sky-god, patriarchal religion/s. In order to do that, coursework will examine works of art and literature that deal with the different aspects of the Goddess, not simply her displacement, but the different ways she is portrayed and referenced – both positively and negatively. A great part of the course lectures are centered around Classical Greece, aimed at taking advantage of the location in which students are studying. An attempt is made to cover a certain sweep of eras and countries to give an indication of how various and profoundly omni-present is the idea of the female Deity.
FILM STUDIES: FROM LITERATURE TO FILM3 credits
This course is designed to alert students to the various ways in which works of literature (novel, short story, and play) are translated to the screen. A selection of films drawn from different literary genres will be considered in order to gain a sense of the historical development of literature and cinema. Students will learn to critique the disparate elements of acting, direction, and in particular the script, while lectures and class discussions will examine how the screenwriter has selected, edited, or changed the literary text. An in-depth exploration will be made into why such choices have been made and consider the effectiveness of such adaptations. Particular emphasis will be placed upon the patterning of thought and theme, evoking a cross-disciplinary analysis of the archetypes central to the Literature and Creative Writing courses. Students will learn to view film and literature as synergistic art forms, appreciating the differences and convergence of the narrative method in both disciplines, thus deepening their critical abilities.
ADVANCED FILM STUDIES: FOUR DIRECTORS (available upon request)3 credits
This course is designed to move the student forward from undergraduate film survey into a close analysis of the work of four important directors of differing national traditions and with different focus and historical significance: Federico Fellini, Alfred Hitchcock, Eric Rohmer, and Luis Bunel. Individual selected films and oeuvres as a whole are considered for their cinematic concerns as well as influence on other filmmakers in order to give the student a strong sense of the significance of each auteur within the scope of film history as well as within an intellectual, social, and technical context. Filmmakers will be discussed in terms of their own development as well, and attention will be given to genre and the evolution of critical approaches to their work. Analysis, group discussions, and individual student presentations will accompany each film, along with readings from course texts.
CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP I3 credits
This course is an intensive workshop designed to encourage writers to discover and experiment with their own voice. The course will assist the student’s exploration into the realm of his/her own creative resources, away from the dependence on learned authority or the weighty impressions of the “great writers.” To aid in this process of discovery, students perform spontaneous writing exercises in class and experiment with persona, voice and character. Each week, students will submit new writing for open, non-judgmental critique and discuss in a small workshop setting the ideas and feelings they possess about writing and how it relates to their lives. Questions on “craft” will be examined from different points of view, but no hierarchy of style or manner will be favored.
CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP II3 credits
This course is an intensive workshop in creative prose, traditional and non-traditional, centered on student work and with special consideration of the interests and academic and professional goals of the workshop members. Course work will concentrate on the writing and editing of student work with a view to increasing the length and complexity of prose pieces towards the goal of the novel. Risk-taking is encouraged, as well as serious self-reflection on writing content and design. The aim is to produce already maturely scrutinized works that can be presented to agents and publishers with some confidence, and a positive attitude towards rejection, revision and criticism.
THEORY OF ART2/3 credits
This course aims to expose students to the ideas and beliefs of other artists in order to help clarify their sense of what it means to be an artist today, and to further enlighten the daily work done in the studio by enabling students to develop their own critical and theoretical points of view. Students will learn to sharpen the verbal, analytical, and presentation skills needed to present one’s ideas and work and/or pursue a concurrent career in museum or gallery work, writing criticism, collecting or cataloguing artworks, or teaching art history. Methods used will include a teacher/student collaborative investigation into why different artists structure their vision the way they do, and an in-depth exploration of artists’ perceptions of their own work, through autobiographical writings, films and music. Discussion sessions will also center on the personal themes and beliefs that each student feels are central to their own art.
BLACK AND WHITE PHOTOGRAPHY3 credits
This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity for exploration into the world and people around us as well as our perceptions. Intensive coursework will assist students in developing technical abilities in exposing negatives and making technically perfect prints, creating a professional portfolio, and mastering the language of photography. In addition, the unique cultural exploratory components of this course will enable students to personalize his/her vision and mode of expression, develop and enhance visual thinking, and provide photographic interaction with Greece and Greek culture: historical and present-day.
LITERATURE: WRITERS IN ANCIENT GREECE3 credits
Homer has been doing just that for about 2700 years. It is impossible to consider the canon of Western literature without acknowledging the debt owed Homer. In addition to the entertainment value of action and romance told through the depiction of many complex characters — archetypal characters who are yet enigmatic and beyond archetypal boundaries — we have the gift of brilliant architecture and and a clear, direct and absolute control of narrative.
We also have the gift of insight: through Homer, writing in the Archaic age about a mythic Heroic age, we get a glimpse of how the ancient Greeks viewed their world. How human beings behaved towards one another was a matter not only of whether or not one survived in Homer’s time, but how one was spoken of in perpetuity. In his story — a weaving together of many old tales — Homer introduces us to Greek ethical and cultural traditions the development of which we chart in the rest of the work read during the semester. During the course of the semester, in three units — Unit 1: Epic Poetry: Homer’s The Odyssey; Unit 2: Archilochus and Sappho: The Emergence of the Personal Voice; and Unit 3: The Great Tragic Poets.
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LITERATURE: MODERN WRITERS IN GREECE3 credits
An expansive and nuanced exploration of the work of Greek writers in the 20th and 21st centuries offers a rich view of the continued robust evolution of Greek writing, building on an unbroken tradition of storytelling lasting many millennia and continuing into the present. The writers we read and discuss lead us through a history of struggle in modern times that evoke an inherited memory of similar trials. These writers have known the depredations of Axis occupation (the Greeks had been occupied many times in history by many different foreign powers), civil war (the Greeks know all the stories of the events of the Peloponnesian conflict), famine, oppression and repression, and the transcendence of the artist — and the people of Greece — through passionate expression of love for their country. These writers tell us, each in his or her way, that it is not nationalism that fuels and sustains their art, but a form of patriotism that transcends all ideology to embrace the landscape itself, the sky, the sea, the iconic architecture, the pervasive and palpable presence of the past, the language, the music, the Greek way of looking at the world that has persevered as long as the Greeks have been Greeks.
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DIGITAL IMAGING I3 credits
For the student who has conventional photography experience, this course is intended as a solid grounding in digital imaging techniques, but aims as well to move forward students who have some acquaintance with artistic digital photography. General procedures related to new technology and equipment including digital photography and digital manipulations, Photoshop and video editing software basics, input and output options will be covered. Students will also become familiar with how to learn new techniques as they emerge for a self-motivated ability to find and use the techniques relevant to their work. Students will manipulate their images and explore the technical illusions of movement and animation. The course will provide a background for contemporary thought about digital images. It includes a survey of current artists working with digital technologies and a discussion of these practices in terms of conceptual questions of documentation, reproduction, what is “live”, self-expression, and theories of objectivity. The current parameters of digital practice will be questioned and students will examine its potential integration into other media. Participants will also question how digital technology might alter perception in terms of simultaneity, continuity, speed of attention, and ideas of truth. It is recommended that the Theories of Art Class at HISA be attended in conjunction with the class.
DIGITAL IMAGING II (available upon request)3 credits
This course is designed for students who have previous experience in photography and digital imaging, and who wish to further develop digital imaging techniques to produce a researched and coherent body of work in artistic digital photography. The course will enhance students’ skills in using various procedures related to new technology and equipment including digital photography and digital manipulations, input and output options, Photoshop and video editing software, all of which are covered in the first semester course, Digital Imaging – Beginner. Students are also required to show some ability in manipulating their images using the technical illusions of movement and animation.
STUDIO FOR INTERRELATED MEDIA3 credits
This intensive inter-disciplinary arts studio class is designed to help students focus their experiential and creative study abroad experience within the context of their Greek island historical, cultural and artistic environment. Elements of mixed-media projects, painting and drawing, digital still and video film, graphic art constructions and installations, will all form part of the student’s semester of study. Also inherent will be lectures and instruction concerning website design and online presentation of art and installation projects, leading to the student’s own career objectives. With an eye on depth of content, as well as exploratory and investigative approaches, basic themes may be drawn from personal experiences, archetypal literary patterns, philosophical and spiritual beliefs.
CROSS DISCIPLINARY PHILOSOPHY: LIFE THEMES2/3 credits
This course is designed to explore and evaluate our personal sources of knowing, believing, and existing. Rather than a traditional survey of philosophers and their writings, the course calls upon each student to examine where his/her moral, ethical, spiritual, political and romantic belief systems originate: how and why we lead our lives the way we do. Fundamental to Life Themes is a challenge to preconceived notions of what we accept as Truth, and in particular preconceived notions of “correctness” in morality, ethics, taboo, loyalty, sacrifice, sex, family relations, and even what we eat. The purpose of the course is not to change anyone’s belief system; but it is the intent of the course’s guided inquiry to encourage students to open their minds to explore the genesis of their own and others’ belief systems.
MODERN GREEK LANGUAGE I3 credits
This course is an introduction to Modern Greek language and the first of two sequential semester classes. It is designed for students wishing to learn Greek as it is written and spoken in Greece today. As well as learning the basic grammar and the skills necessary to read texts of moderate difficulty and to converse on a wide range of topics, students explore the Modern Greek cultural landscape and living habits, participating in field trips as part of their assignments. Thus, this introduction to the language aids a cultural immersion into the whole of contemporary Greek society.
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MODERN GREEK LANGUAGE II3 credits
This course is an introduction to Modern Greek language and the second of two sequential semester classes. It is designed for students wishing to learn Greek as it is written and spoken in Greece today. As well as learning the basic grammar and the skills necessary to read texts of moderate difficulty and to converse on a wide range of topics, students explore the Modern Greek cultural landscape and living habits, participating in field trips as part of their assignments. Thus, this introduction to the language aids a cultural immersion into the whole of contemporary Greek society. Pre-requisite: Modern Greek Language I
CYCLADIC ART & CULTURE*2/3 credits
For artists, writers, photographers, and adventurers

An intense, fun-filled two week encounter with Paros and selected neighboring islands that unlocks the secret authenticity of Cycladic rural life. Journey along infrequently traveled Byzantine trails to remote villages and mountain farms, as well as ancient caves and marble quarries, historic monasteries and ruins.

Unearth a humanistic island archeology beyond the textbook or tour. When not capturing your own impressions on paper or film, see how Paros’s modern sculptors, artists and ceramists work to build on a continuity from ancient Greek culture, and attend evening performances of music and dance. The specially designed course allows students of Drawing and Painting, Creative Writing, and Photography, to work on their own art, while also experiencing the wonders and excitement of an historic culture.

*Please note: This course is two weeks long. Therefore, if this course is taken on its own, the program dates will be June 7 – 20 or July 2 – 16.

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CREATIVE WRITING3 credits

Beginner: June

Advanced: July

Undergraduate credit and graduate credit available. The course includes an Art & Cultural investigation of important classic sites on Paros, as well as trips to sites and museums on neighboring islands.

This is a multi-aspect workshop that investigates the relationship between the writer and his/her life landscape. Over the term we will read and discuss the work of writers whose travel in other lands, especially Greece, has affected, and in a significant way created the essence of their poems and prose. How does the nature of our travel to a new place impact our writing? How does the heart respond to its new environment?

An ongoing element of the workshop will involve our own writing; a search for a new vantage point; adding new windows to our perspective. As a class, in a cooperative and supportive manner, we will workshop our own poems and share ideas relevant to the critical and editing process.

Places are limited, so please apply early!

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PHOTOGRAPHY / DIGITAL IMAGING
3 credits

Digital Imaging: June

Black and White Photography: July

For artists, writers, photographers, and adventurers

Students will explore the history and craft of photography using the beautiful and historic backdrop of Paros and other Cyclades islands as inspiration. The course will examine such topics as landscape, portraiture and digital techniques and is structured to take full advantage of the experience of being in the Cyclades. Class time will include field trips, technical demonstrations, darkroom work, individual and group critiques.

This course is open to students with all levels of photo experience. Students can work with black and white film or digitally. All beginning students will master the basics of camera usage and composition. Those concentrating on black and white photography will learn film development and printing as well as other darkroom techniques. Students concentrating in Digital Photography will be given an introduction to the Adobe Photoshop software and its endless possibilities. More advanced students can work in either mode but will be guided in the expansion of their personal photographic vision and skills while creating more ambitious photographic projects.

Places are limited, so please apply early!

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SUMMER ART WORKSHOP: PAINTING
3 credits

AVAILABLE: July

“The Summer Art Workshop aims to enhance the student’s understanding of developing a painting both physically as well as conceptually.”

Students are encouraged to develop their own artistic visions, and enabled by the technical proficiency and practical knowledge of HISA’s working-artist instructors. Art workshop students are also encouraged to explore Greek culture and environment and to incorporate their new experiences and perspective into their creative craft. Trips to nearby islands such as Naxos, Santorini and Delos, among other significant cultural and historical destinations reveal the origins of classical Greek art that have essentially contributed to aesthetic ideals and artistic theory. Students can broaden their perspective of the historical spectrum of painting and deepen their understanding and engagement in their own creations.

Places are limited, so please apply early!

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