HEIDELBERG, GERMANY

COURSE CATALOG

HEIDELBERG COURSES

FIND YOUR COURSES

Courses in Heidelberg fill up VERY QUICKLY, so be sure to register as early as possible to maximize your chances at getting in the courses you need. You can register once you are accepted into the program.

Browse courses by expanding the sections below to reveal course codes, credits, descriptions and syllabi if available. Please note, courses are subject to change.  

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Immersion Block (Choose 1)

Business Simulation at SRH

Contact Hours: 100
ECTS Credits:  4

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Doing Business in Europe at SRH

Contact Hours: 150
ECTS Credits:  6

Upon completion of the course, students will be able to: • compare European markets and business environments with other international landscapes • examine some of the key industries – and institutions governing those industries – in Europe • identify market opportunities in Europe • develop basic elements of a business plan for market entry in Europe.

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Introduction to Business Ethics at SRH

Contact Hours: 150
ECTS Credits:  6

This course is an introduction to ‘Business Ethics’ – the moral principles or values that generally govern the conduct of an individual or group which determines an employee or company’s every day conduct.

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Entrepreneurship at SRH

Contact Hours: 100
ECTS Credits:  4

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European Society and Culture at SRH

Contact Hours: 180
ECTS Credits:  8

Throughout the scope of this course, students will:

  • Understand the European Union, including its history, geography, component parts, organization, and legislation
  • Understand Europe as a supranational structure guaranteed by treaty
  • Understand the development of the welfare state in Europe
  • Understand the gender dimension as well as human rights
  • Understand the reasons for uniting Europe, analysis of the results
  • Understand migration and ethnisation: theory and social processes
  • Understand the basics of European communication and cooperation
  • Understand the European Business, Economics, and Politics
  • Explore the nature and definition of “culture,” understanding the impact of language, culture, and values on working relationships
  • Be able to contribute to European business practice
  • Appreciate diverse landscape of various social values and norms, cultural traditions, historical factors, and fluctuating economies within the EU
  • Be familiar with the basic tools for approaching business and life within Europe, with a special focus on Germany.

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Intensive German Language

Course Code: GERM 1312, 2311, 2312
US Credits:  3

Course will take place at the International House Collegium Palatinum. Students enrolling in a non-beginner level will be enrolled in the level based on a placement test.

A Refugee Crisis: A Multi-Disciplinary Policy Perspective on European Refugee Crisis

Course Code: HIST 4399
US Credits:  3

Living in another country, even for a short period, allows one to develop a sense of cultural empathy and understanding that cannot be replicated within your home country. This course helps students not only think more deeply about their own cultural identity, but helps them build a framework for understanding one of the most pressing issues of our time, how to manage the greater than 50 million refugees across the world. We will examine the issue from an academic and personal perspective interacting with the local community in Heidelberg and beyond as we review myriad of sources from poems, to news articles, to journal articles, to works of art.

This course requires volunteer work, which will take place in the ESC block.

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ESC Block (Choose 4)

Art History: Ancient through Medieval

Course Code: ARTH 2361
US Credits:  3

The course will survey the art and architecture from the Ancient world to the Middle Ages, including the art of the Near East, Egypt, the Classical Greek and Roman worlds, and Medieval Europe, from about 3500 BC to about 1400 AD. It will reflect the great variety and richness of the arts of these different cultures, and some of the general problems of how art historians understand and write about art. Examples of art reviewed include works of sculpture, architecture, wall and vase painting, mosaic, manuscript illumination, and other media in their physical, historical and social contexts.

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Principles of Accounting I – Financial Accounting

Course Code: ACCT 2311
US Credits:  3

This course is an introduction to financial accounting within the framework of business and business decisions. The role and use of accounting information by external decision makers will be emphasized. The course provides an in-depth analysis of financial statements and annual reports of publicly traded companies.

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Principles of Accounting II – Managerial Accounting

Course Code: ACCT 2312
US Credits:  3

The role of management accounting continues to undergo major changes. Management accountants are no longer only scorekeepers of past performance. They have become value-adding members of management teams, creating information vital for enhancing operational excellence, and for formulating and implementing new strategies. A significant development in this new role is a great increase in the importance of and use of nonfinancial measures of performance.

In this class, we will focus on how managers can use accounting information to assist them in making decisions and how accounting information can be used to control the actions of other members of the firm. This orientation contrasts with financial accounting where the focus is on accounting disclosures for parties external to the firm. The course will cover the vocabulary and mechanics of cost accounting, basic issues involved in the design of a cost accounting system, and the role of management accounting in decisions concerning resource allocation and performance evaluation.

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Special Topics in Information Systems / Information Systems in Accounting

Course Code: TBD
US Credits:  3

Course Code and syllabus to follow.

Finance – Capital Budgeting

Course Code: TBD
US Credits:  3

Course code and syllabus to follow.

International Marketing

Course Code: BINT 3361
US Credits:  3

International Marketing is designed as an upper-level course to acquaint students with the magnitude of the global marketplace. The focus is on the strategic concepts of global marketing and the influence of environmental forces on marketing activities and global market potential. The course will also explore the impact of the digital revolution on global marketing. Prerequisites: BINT 3331 and BMKT 3331

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Organizational Behavior & Leadership

Course Code: BMGT 4355
US Credits:  3

Students will learn to understand how individual behavior and group dynamics affect and are affected by organizational settings. Topics such as Motivation, leadership, teamwork, and communication are being addressed. The course provides insights into the study of organizations as social systems; the dynamics of change in organizations, industries and markets; and the relationships between organizations and their environments.

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World Literature

Course Code: ENGL 2310
US Credits:  3

Part of the UIW Core Curriculum, this course includes close reading and discussion of texts of all kinds from a wide range of periods and societies to reveal the diversity of literature as a means of cultural statement. This course is designed as a directed exploration of worldwide literary genres and techniques of close study that emphasizes the development of critical reading skills and methodologies of literary analysis, i.e. of what can be said well about a work of art. Close readings of the assigned literary works will help develop our appreciation of literature as finely crafted, multidimensional art. In addition, such readings allow us to examine the connections between literature and culture. In examining these connections, we explore the role of art and the artist in social justice, an important aspect of study at our university.

View Syllabus

German Language

Course Code: GERM 1311, 1312, 2311, 2312
US Credits:  3

This course introduces students to fundamentals of a foreign language, with emphasis on developing listening comprehension and speaking skills. It includes activities for developing abilities in speaking, listening, reading, and writing.

*Students enrolling in a non-beginner level will be enrolled in the level based on a placement test.

View Syllabus

Exp. Learning in Europe / Topics in Comparative Politics / International Relations

Course Code: GOVT/BINT 3340
US Credits:  3

This course is designed to help students make the most of their study abroad experience in Germany. Numerous excursions have been built into this study abroad program and coursework consists of participating on these excursions, researching and presenting about places to be visited, and reflective writing.

View Syllabus

Current Topics in the EU

Course Code: GOVT 3350
US Credits:  3

The dawn of the modern era has been dominated predominantly by developments centered on the European continent and its conflicting interests at home and abroad. However, as far as a general survey of the entire state-systems of Europe are concerned, it has never been easy in general to label any different groups of states according to their individual merits. For a continent betraying so much diversity in terms of histories, cultures, developmental peculiarities as well as traditional allegiances, any process of classification would need to consider a significant volume of literature and factors cutting across the width and breadth of all the social sciences.

This course will seek to investigate into the concept of Europeanness as a form of shared cultural identity and the underlying realities of perceptions and self-perceptions that may be accounted to validate our understandings of that notion.

Much emphasis will be placed on issues of the 20″“ Century that contributed essentially to the remodeling of the Europe found currently in the 21“ Century. As in the case of any course or undertaking of this kind, the main focus of the individual class agenda will be driven to highlight the comparative and transitional factors of European politics, institutional developments, processes of government and their impact on general international and economic relations in conjunction with their overall implications for the contemporary global social fabric at large.

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Selected Topics in World History: Nazi Germany

Course Code: HIST 4350
US Credits:  3

This course is meant to introduce students to the darkest chapter of German history. The land of Luther, Bach and Goethe is also the land of Hitler and the Holocaust. After unification by Prussia, Germany played a pivotal role in the European balance of power, yet for a long time did not find a satisfactory identity. The aftermath of World War I, long-standing anti-Semitism, and social tensions helped pave the way for Hitler’s rise to power and unleash another world war, including genocide.

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Culturology and Cross Cultural Communication

Course Code: SOCI 3332
US Credits:  3

This course is concerned with the general issues of cultural sensitivity and diversity awareness. From an academic point of view, the following brief introduction to the subject can be offered: Individuals, groups and associations in society interact with one another from an ever widening variety of cultural, linguistic, and ethnic backgrounds. There is therefore a permanent and growing need for cultural competency awareness and training. Some traditional development models that address diversity emphasize the importance of learning culturally specific information, such as behavioral and communication patterns, traditions, values and value-systems, as well as religious practices, symbols, and rituals. Meanwhile, Culturology – or the scientific approach to the study of culture, has spawned a variety of new fields of research in the social sciences.

In fact, while all the above attributes may be seen as relevant, being knowledgeable about specific cultures and groups may not make it necessarily easier to respect and appreciate differences and to interact effectively with persons from other cultures. Developing cultural sensitivity and diversity awareness is extremely complex and an ongoing process. This is because culture can include how human beings live, how they relate in a standard way to their own worlds, their expectations, assumptions, particular preferences, child-rearing practices, attitudes about time or money, definitions of achievement, concepts of beauty, art, music and food, to name only a few. Nonetheless, culture – at the same time, is only one element which defines individual personalities.

The course will emphasize the processes required to understand how specific factors may influence the perceptions and attitudes of different cultures toward one another. In the broader context, there are some standard propositions bearing on notions of international political culturology as a subfield of international relations. These are concerned with efforts aimed at understanding the global cultural system, as well as its numerous subsystems. The aim of this course is to explain how cultural variables interact with politics, economics, business and workplace dynamics as influential factors in world affairs.

The importance of cultural studies flows from the realization that every society is composed of several community areas. People in one area may have common ties of culture, race, language, religion or traditions which make them essentially different from those in other areas. It is the basic function of the institutional structures of all societies to retain the loyalty of all communities and citizens. A key prerequisite to the retention of loyalty is associated with the presence of norms of equality and fairness which are also major determinants of individual prosperity, peace and stability.

The propositions underlying the course will enable students to identify the specific modes of inter-cultural communication which may ultimately function as catalysts to the promotion – or obstruction – of understanding between culturally diverse individuals or social groups.

View Syllabus

Immersion Block (Choose 1)

Current Topics of International Business II

Contact Hours: 200
ECTS Credits:  8

Having completed Current Topics in Business student’s knowledge of business tools will be expanded and enhance their capability of implementing them to a number of topics / challenges that apply to the current international business environment. Students will be able to analyze the arguments or major conflicts surrounding an issue, including current affairs relating to the subject, and will be enabled to apply their knowledge and research to real problems and to communicate their conclusions in a professional environment.

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Human Resource Management at SRH

Contact Hours: 150
ECTS Credits:  6

After this course, students will:

  • Understand behavioral patters as a basic principle of intervention.
  • Become familiar with organizational structure and the tools for its implementation.
  • Understand the various roles of HR work within a company.
  • Recognize appropriate situations for applying HR tools (by way of examples)

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Introduction to Accounting at SRH

Contact Hours: 150
ECTS Credits:  6

This course enables students to lead the books through a business year beginning with the opening balance sheet and ending by the annual financial statement. Furthermore the students will obtain a fundamental understanding of the rules and techniques of bookkeeping. This course is the prerequisite for the constitutive course “International Accounting”.

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International Accounting at SRH

Contact Hours: 150
ECTS Credits:  6

The module “International Accounting” provides an introduction to the framework, concepts and practices associated with international financial reporting standards. Students will obtain a fundamental understanding of accounting. The role and use of accounting information by external decision makers will be emphasized. Students will perform an in-depth analysis of financial statements, and annual reports. Furthermore, the differences between IFRS and national accounting systems (particularly HGB) will be emphasized.

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Marketing Management at SRH

Contact Hours: 200
ECTS Credits:  8

On completion of this program, bachelor students will have a deeper and more solid understanding of the selected marketing principles covered in the course, will have developed an insight into the concept of innovation and innovation management (particularly with respect to new product development and launch), and will appreciate the ways that the internet has transformed marketing and business.

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Sales

Contact Hours: 150
ECTS Credits:  6

Upon successful completion of the course, students should have a basic understanding of the structure and functioning of the Market, and understand factors affecting both production companies, of investment and consumer goods, as well as commercial enterprises. The student will understand the underlying distribution systems and the central instruments of sales management and can identify the corresponding structures in practice.

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Intensive German Language

Course Code: GERM 1312, 2311, 2312
US Credits:  3

Course will take place at the International House Collegium Palatinum. Students enrolling in a non-beginner level will be enrolled in the level based on a placement test.

Contemporary German History in a European Context

Course Code: HIST 3340
US Credits:  3

This course studies the political, economic, and religious expansion of Europe from the 15th century to the present;the rise of the modern state system and the rise of modern society and economics during the 17th and 18th centuries; the impact of the French Revolution, nationalism, and mass politics in the last two centuries; the rise and fall of Totalitarianism in Bolshevik Russia, Fascist Italy, and Nazi Germany; the intellectual and artistic movements of the 19th and 20th centuries; the present conditions of Europe and its drive toward a unified Continent.

View Syllabus

ESC Block (Choose 4)

Exp. Learning in Europe / Topics in Comparative Politics / International Relations

Course Code: GOVT/BINT 3340
US Credits:  3

This course is designed to help students make the most of their study abroad experience in Germany. Numerous excursions have been built into this study abroad program and coursework consists of participating on these excursions, researching and presenting about places to be visited, and reflective writing.

View Syllabus

Art History: Renaissance to Modern

Course Code: ARTH 2362
US Credits:  3

The course will survey the Western art and architecture from the early Renaissance to the Twentieth Century. It considers the formal, intellectual and spiritual values within Western art during the last seven centuries. A special focus – to make use of the particular advantages of the Study Abroad semester – is placed on local examples, be it classical works of art exhibited in Heidelberg, Mannheim or Worms museum collections or in German museums of global importance visited during the semester excursions, such as the museums in Berlin or Frankfurt, or by visits to local or regional landmarks like the baroque palaces of Schwetzingen and Mannheim, or the exhibits of the Kurpfälzisches Museum.

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Finance – Capital Budgeting

Course Code: TBD
US Credits:  3

Course code and syllabus to follow.

International Marketing Management

Course Code: BMKT 4390
US Credits:  3

The aim of this course is to develop strategies in planning marketing in an international perspective. This will be done through reading, class discussions, case studies and the development of a marketing plan.

View Syllabus

World Literature

Course Code: ENGL 2310
US Credits:  3

Part of the UIW Core Curriculum, this course includes close reading and discussion of texts of all kinds from a wide range of periods and societies to reveal the diversity of literature as a means of cultural statement. This course is designed as a directed exploration of worldwide literary genres and techniques of close study that emphasizes the development of critical reading skills and methodologies of literary analysis, i.e. of what can be said well about a work of art. Close readings of the assigned literary works will help develop our appreciation of literature as finely crafted, multidimensional art. In addition, such readings allow us to examine the connections between literature and culture. In examining these connections, we explore the role of art and the artist in social justice, an important aspect of study at our university.

View Syllabus

German Language

Course Code: GERM 1311, 1312, 2311, 2312
US Credits:  3

This course introduces students to fundamentals of a foreign language, with emphasis on developing listening comprehension and speaking skills. It includes activities for developing abilities in speaking, listening, reading, and writing.

*Students enrolling in a non-beginner level will be enrolled in the level based on a placement test.

View Syllabus

Current Topics in the EU

Course Code: GOVT 3350
US Credits:  3

The dawn of the modern era has been dominated predominantly by developments centered on the European continent and its conflicting interests at home and abroad. However, as far as a general survey of the entire state-systems of Europe are concerned, it has never been easy in general to label any different groups of states according to their individual merits. For a continent betraying so much diversity in terms of histories, cultures, developmental peculiarities as well as traditional allegiances, any process of classification would need to consider a significant volume of literature and factors cutting across the width and breadth of all the social sciences.

This course will seek to investigate into the concept of Europeanness as a form of shared cultural identity and the underlying realities of perceptions and self-perceptions that may be accounted to validate our understandings of that notion.

Much emphasis will be placed on issues of the 20″“ Century that contributed essentially to the remodeling of the Europe found currently in the 21“ Century. As in the case of any course or undertaking of this kind, the main focus of the individual class agenda will be driven to highlight the comparative and transitional factors of European politics, institutional developments, processes of government and their impact on general international and economic relations in conjunction with their overall implications for the contemporary global social fabric at large.

View Syllabus

Psychology of Power, Oppression, and Privilege (including community engaged learning experience)

Course Code: PSYC 3399
US Credits:  3

Psychology of Power, Oppression, and Privilege is designed to be a specialized course for the Social Specialization within the Psychology major. This course provides an in-depth coverage of psychology topics,including stereotyping, prejudice and privilege, discrimination and advantage, intergroup relations, attributions, social influence, personal self-esteem and collective self-esteem. In addition, this course provides further opportunities for students to develop their writing, speaking, and presentation skills.

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World Philosophy

Course Code: PHIL 3355
US Credits:  3

This course deals with philosophy in a global context. It presents the world’s view of philosophy from ancient to contemporary times and emphasizes the contributions of thinkers chosen from a broad range of cultural and ethnic backgrounds. Emphasis will be placed on the wide diversity and historical backgrounds of various philosophical traditions. The course also offers an introduction to some of the basic origins which enable us to appreciate the value-systems of the five major living religious cultures of the world: Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

The course will not engage in any deep examination of the history of each religious tradition. However, the primary focus will be phenomenological, in other words, the lived experience of each tradition as it grapples with such matters as the nature of God and creation, the origin of evil, human responsibility, morality, and social issues of society. This does not imply that the analytical concerns will constitute a course in theology, which is the detailed study of specific religious doctrines or dogma. The two frequently tend to deal with similar issues, however, from quite different perspectives.

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Social Psychology

Course Code: PSYC/SOCI 3351
US Credits:  3

This course studies individual behavior and attitudes as influenced by other individuals and groups, and considers issues such as conformity, attitude formation and change, attraction, aggression, prejudice, and altruism. Cross referenced with SOCI 3351. Prerequisites: PSYC 1301 or SOCI 1311.

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Culturology and Cross Cultural Communication

Course Code: SOCI 3332
US Credits:  3

This course is concerned with the general issues of cultural sensitivity and diversity awareness. From an academic point of view, the following brief introduction to the subject can be offered: Individuals, groups and associations in society interact with one another from an ever widening variety of cultural, linguistic, and ethnic backgrounds. There is therefore a permanent and growing need for cultural competency awareness and training. Some traditional development models that address diversity emphasize the importance of learning culturally specific information, such as behavioral and communication patterns, traditions, values and value-systems, as well as religious practices, symbols, and rituals. Meanwhile, Culturology – or the scientific approach to the study of culture, has spawned a variety of new fields of research in the social sciences.

In fact, while all the above attributes may be seen as relevant, being knowledgeable about specific cultures and groups may not make it necessarily easier to respect and appreciate differences and to interact effectively with persons from other cultures. Developing cultural sensitivity and diversity awareness is extremely complex and an ongoing process. This is because culture can include how human beings live, how they relate in a standard way to their own worlds, their expectations, assumptions, particular preferences, child-rearing practices, attitudes about time or money, definitions of achievement, concepts of beauty, art, music and food, to name only a few. Nonetheless, culture – at the same time, is only one element which defines individual personalities.

The course will emphasize the processes required to understand how specific factors may influence the perceptions and attitudes of different cultures toward one another. In the broader context, there are some standard propositions bearing on notions of international political culturology as a subfield of international relations. These are concerned with efforts aimed at understanding the global cultural system, as well as its numerous subsystems. The aim of this course is to explain how cultural variables interact with politics, economics, business and workplace dynamics as influential factors in world affairs.

The importance of cultural studies flows from the realization that every society is composed of several community areas. People in one area may have common ties of culture, race, language, religion or traditions which make them essentially different from those in other areas. It is the basic function of the institutional structures of all societies to retain the loyalty of all communities and citizens. A key prerequisite to the retention of loyalty is associated with the presence of norms of equality and fairness which are also major determinants of individual prosperity, peace and stability.

The propositions underlying the course will enable students to identify the specific modes of inter-cultural communication which may ultimately function as catalysts to the promotion – or obstruction – of understanding between culturally diverse individuals or social groups.

View Syllabus

International Marketing Management

Course Code: BMKT 4390
US Credits:  3

Students will be able to critically apply general principles of marketing such as marketing research, the marketing mix, product life cycle, segmentation, targeting and positioning in a cross-cultural and intercultural setting and will experience how this leads to a marketing management strategy in a global context.

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Experiential Learning in Europe

Course Code: GOVT 3340
US Credits:  3

This course is designed to help students make the most of their study abroad experience in Germany. Numerous excursions have been built into this study abroad program and coursework consists of participating on these excursions, researching and presenting about places to be visited, and reflective writing.

View Syllabus

Current Topics in the EU

Course Code: GOVT 3350
US Credits:  3

The dawn of the modern era has been dominated predominantly by developments centered on the European continent and its conflicting interests at home and abroad. However, as far as a general survey of the entire state-systems of Europe are concerned, it has never been easy in general to label any different groups of states according to their individual merits. For a continent betraying so much diversity in terms of histories, cultures, developmental peculiarities as well as traditional allegiances, any process of classification would need to consider a significant volume of literature and factors cutting across the width and breadth of all the social sciences.

This course will seek to investigate into the concept of Europeanness as a form of shared cultural identity and the underlying realities of perceptions and self-perceptions that may be accounted to validate our understandings of that notion.

Much emphasis will be placed on issues of the 20″“ Century that contributed essentially to the remodeling of the Europe found currently in the 21“ Century. As in the case of any course or undertaking of this kind, the main focus of the individual class agenda will be driven to highlight the comparative and transitional factors of European politics, institutional developments, processes of government and their impact on general international and economic relations in conjunction with their overall implications for the contemporary global social fabric at large.

View Syllabus

Elementary German Language I

Course Code: GERM 1311
US Credits:  3

This course introduces students to fundamentals of a foreign language, with emphasis on developing listening comprehension and speaking skills. It includes activities for developing abilities in speaking, listening, reading, and writing.

View Syllabus

Special Topics Courses

Students may select two courses from the special topics courses or two courses from general courses at the European Study Center.

Cultural Influences in Therapeutic Rehabilitation

Course Code: ATHP 3331
US Credits:  3

The purpose of this course is to provide students with the knowledge, skills, and abilities to interact and perform (a) an intervention that includes the use of therapeutic rehabilitation concepts in the treatment and care of athletic injuries and orthopedic conditions; (b) a screening to examine patients for indications, contraindications, and precautions for therapeutic exercise techniques ; (c) discussion and education with the patient; (d) an assessment to examine for impact of intervention; and (e) administrative risk assessment of therapeutic rehabilitation tools and equipment used in a facility; (f) synthesis of cultural influences on therapeutic rehabilitation techniques and philosophies. Topics of this course include the discussion of indications and contraindications of therapeutic exercise, the appropriate application and procedure(s), use of evidence based protocols, evaluation of intervention, and safe patient practice skills with a comparison of techniques used in other cultures. This three credit hour course uses lecture, discussion, demonstration, case study presentation, and current innovative technology along with course readings to prepare the student to master course content. Students will be assessed through written examination(s) and coursework. Successful completion of the course provides the student with fundamental knowledge, skills, and abilities needed to advance in their major.

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Global Justice and Christianity

Course Code: RELS 3399
US Credits:  3

Global realities of injustice in the 21st century increasingly challenge religious traditions both to respond to and to take responsibility for past actions that have contributed to contemporary injustices. Given that just action is necessarily a criterion of authentic Christian theology and practice, this course will explore the basic theological foundations of the Christian faith in relation to contemporary ethical concerns related to inequality, poverty, violence and ecological destruction. Specific attention is directed to the theology of creation, the historical Jesus, Christology, and the image of the reign of God. This class would be of interest to students engaged in a variety of different fields of study, such as, theology, biblical studies, ethics, and politics.

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Goblins, Grannies, and the Brothers Grimm: German Fairy Tales as Literature & Creative Writing

Course Code: ENGL  3310H / 3375
US Credits:  3

Both courses will be carried out simultaneously, with requirements coinciding. The critical (secondary) and primary texts will be read by all students in developing a cultural and critical perspective on the works. Small assignments will focus on creative and critical perspective, each assignment designed to develop an individual student’s awareness of literature as a “created artifact” (complete with technical and formal considerations that contemporary forms still retain today) and as a “cultural product” (a work that is born from its own historical discourse and thereby subject to renewed or differing interpretations). All work will be carried out with the express purpose of expanding the students’ comprehension and capacity for understanding how fiction “works” and how even its older forms are still very much utilized and relevant in today’s literary world. Final projects will be carried out by all students, resulting in a 4,000 – 6,000 word creative OR critical work.

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Doing Business in Germany

Course Code: BINT 4399
US Credits:  3

This is a special topics course conducted at the European Study Center in Heidelberg, Germany and consists of a number of classes and topic related excursions. Students will explore the various aspects of doing business in Germany as they relate to management.

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Modern Europe

Course Code: HIST 3340
US Credits:  3

This course studies the political, economic, and religious expansion of Europe from the 15th century to the present; the rise of the modern state system and the rise of modern society and economics during the 17th and 18th centuries; the impact of the French Revolution, nationalism, and mass politics in the last two centuries; the rise and fall of Totalitarianism in Bolshevik Russia, Fascist Italy, and Nazi Germany; the intellectual and artistic movements of the 19th and 20th centuries; the present conditions of Europe and its drive toward a unified Continent.

View Syllabus

Culturology and Cross-Cultural Communication

Course Code: SOCI 3332
US Credits:  3

This course is concerned with the general issues of cultural sensitivity and diversity awareness. From an academic point of view, the following brief introduction to the subject can be offered: Individuals, groups and associations in society interact with one another from an ever widening variety of cultural, linguistic, and ethnic backgrounds. There is therefore a permanent and growing need for cultural competency awareness and training. Some traditional development models that address diversity emphasize the importance of learning culturally specific information, such as behavioral and communication patterns, traditions, values and value-systems, as well as religious practices, symbols, and rituals. Meanwhile, Culturology – or the scientific approach to the study of culture, has spawned a variety of new fields of research in the social sciences.

In fact, while all the above attributes may be seen as relevant, being knowledgeable about specific cultures and groups may not make it necessarily easier to respect and appreciate differences and to interact effectively with persons from other cultures. Developing cultural sensitivity and diversity awareness is extremely complex and an ongoing process. This is because culture can include how human beings live, how they relate in a standard way to their own worlds, their expectations, assumptions, particular preferences, child-rearing practices, attitudes about time or money, definitions of achievement, concepts of beauty, art, music and food, to name only a few. Nonetheless, culture – at the same time, is only one element which defines individual personalities.

The course will emphasize the processes required to understand how specific factors may influence the perceptions and attitudes of different cultures toward one another. In the broader context, there are some standard propositions bearing on notions of international political culturology as a subfield of international relations. These are concerned with efforts aimed at understanding the global cultural system, as well as its numerous subsystems. The aim of this course is to explain how cultural variables interact with politics, economics, business and workplace dynamics as influential factors in world affairs.

The importance of cultural studies flows from the realization that every society is composed of several community areas. People in one area may have common ties of culture, race, language, religion or traditions which make them essentially different from those in other areas. It is the basic function of the institutional structures of all societies to retain the loyalty of all communities and citizens. A key prerequisite to the retention of loyalty is associated with the presence of norms of equality and fairness which are also major determinants of individual prosperity, peace and stability.

The propositions underlying the course will enable students to identify the specific modes of inter-cultural communication which may ultimately function as catalysts to the promotion – or obstruction – of understanding between culturally diverse individuals or social groups.

View Syllabus

Elementary German Language I

Course Code: GERM 1311
US Credits:  3

This course introduces students to fundamentals of a foreign language, with emphasis on developing listening comprehension and speaking skills. It includes activities for developing abilities in speaking, listening, reading, and writing.

View Syllabus

Special Topics Courses

Students may select two courses from the special topics courses or two courses from general courses at the European Study Center. Significant weekday travel is required for special topics courses in summer II and this will not allow for students to be enrolled in one course from each group.

Medieval Philosophy

Course Code: PHIL 3352
US Credits:  3

Medieval philosophy, at its broadest, spans the period of time between the end of the Classical era (roughly the 2nd century CE) and the beginning of the Renaissance (roughly the 15th century). During this period, philosophers sought to combine the philosophy of their classical pagan predecessors (mainly Plato and Aristotle) with Christianity, Judaism, and Islam. This combination resulted in major intellectual developments, some of which will be the focus of this course: The problem of free will, the limits of rationality, the existence of God, and the problem of evil.

Most philosophers active during this time lived in Europe, which underwent major political, social, and religious changes. The selection of texts we will read track the intellectual and sometimes geographical journey that reflect philosophers’ roles in and responses to these changes. These changes are still visible in medieval European art and architecture, which were not designed to be aesthetic, but regularly reflected philosophical and theological doctrines. We will therefore conduct a journey of our own, tracing medieval philosophical thought by visiting historical medieval castles, museums, churches and universities in Heidelberg, Paris, and other places in Southern Germany.

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